LEC 13 - GI IV Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in LEC 13 - GI IV Deck (47):
1

How do animals become infected with Group A rotavirus?

Orally

2

What does Group A rotavirus target in the body?

villus enterocytes

3

What are clinical hallmarks of a Group A rotavirus infection?

Yellow-watery diarrhea 

Dehydration 

4

When are calves susceptible to Group A rotavirus?

first week of age

5

When are piglets susceptible to group A rotavirus infections?

First 7 weeks of life

6

What secretory enterotoxin is produced by Group A rotavirus?

NSP4

7

What is the pathogenesis of group A rotavirus infection?

Upper 2/3 of villi are affected 

Necrosis of epithelium 

Shortening + fusion of villi 

Virus produces NSP4 increasing Cl- secretion 

Blocks Na/Glu cotransporter 

Malabsorptive + Secretory diarrhea 

8

What is the pathogenesis of coronavirus enteritis?

Crypt epithelium can be hyperplastic + necrotic 

Crypt abscesses form 

Characterized by necrotic cellular debris dilating crypts 

9

What animals are affected by adenoviral enteritis?

Cattle 

Sheep 

Pig 

Goat 

Ibex 

Cervids

Horses 

Breaded dragons

10

In Arabian horses what does adenovirus infections associate with?

Combined immunodeficiency

11

How is adenovirus transmitted?

Aerosol 

Fomites 

Feces

12

What cell type does adenovirus target?

Epithelium endothelium 

13

What occurs to the villus with an adenovirus infection?

Loss

Villus blunting + Fusion

14

What are the histopathological signs of an adenovirus infection?

Basophilic to amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies 

15

What animals are most affected by E. Coli?

Young Animals 

Pigs + Calves 

16

  • What are the determining factors that determine if an e. coli infection shows disease? 

Genetic make-up 

Passive transfer 

Milk-associated antibodies 

Environmental contamination/stressors 

Concurrent infections

17

What are the five forms of e. coli?

ETEC 

EIEC 

EHEC 

EPEC/AEEC 

Edema disease

18

Describe: ETEC

Enterotoxic/enterotoxigenic 

19

Describe: EIEC 

Specticemic/Enteroinvasive 

20

Describe: EHEC

Enterohemorrhagic

21

Describe: EPEC/AEEC

Enteropathogenic/Attaching + Effacing 

22

Describe: Edema disease

Enterotoxemic

23

How do all e. coli attach to cells?

Pili 

-- or -- 

Fimbriae 

24

What toxins do e. coli produce?

Enterotoxin 

-- and -- 

Shigatoxin

25

What age is most affected by ETEC?

2 days to 3 weeks 

26

What animals are most commonly infected by ETEC?

Calves 

Piglets

27

What does ETEC cause?

Secretory diarrhea 

28

How does ETEC cause secretory diarrhea?

Endotoxin induced Na/Cl secretion into lumen by affecting cGMP and CGAMP dependent kinase

29

What animals are infected by EIEC? 

Newborn calves + lambs 

Occasionally foals 

30

What is the pathogenesis of EIEC?

Bacteria enter umbilicus + oral cavit + Respiratory 

Multisystemic inection 

Fibrin deposition + Neutrophilic inflammation

31

What animals are susceptible to edema disease?

Pigs 

Between 6 to 14 weeks 

Dietary changes at weaning

32

What does the bacteria responsible for edema disease produce? 

Verotoxin 

33

What is the characteristic signs of edema disease?

Neurologic signs 

Incoordination + Poor balance + Weakness + Tremors 

34

What is the pathogenesis of Edema disease?

Bacteria proliferate in NI 

Produce angiotoxin 

Causes vascular endothelial injury of arteries 

Fluid loss + Edema 

35

What is often the cause of EHEC infection?

Contaminated ground beef 

Not a naturally occurring disease 

36

What is the pathogenesis of EHEC?

Bacteria produces a shiga-toxin 

Contains plasmid encoding for hemolysin 

Produces hemorrhagic colitis 

37

What animals does EPEC/AEEC infect?

Rabbits 

Calves 

Pigs 

Lambs 

Dogs 

Humans

38

What gross lesions are present with EPEC/AEEC?

Dilated + Fluid filled intestinal tract 

 

39

How does pathogenesis of EPEC/AAEC occur?

Intimin facilitates attachment to enterocytes 

Effacement of surface microvilli + alters tight junction proteins

Loss of glycocalyx 

 

40

What does EPEC/AAEC cause?

Maldigestion 

Malabsorption 

Diarrhea 

41

What is the second most common food borne pathogen?

Salmonella Typhurium 

42

What are the serovars of salmonella seen in animals?

Typhimurium 

Cholerasuis 

Enterica 

Dublin 

Typhosa 

43

What are the three forms of salmonellosis? 

Peracute 

Acute 

Chronic 

44

What is different about Salmonella Typhimurium + Cholerasuis? 

Produced toxins blocked closure of Cl channels 

Result in secretory diarrhea + malabsorption 

45

What is the pathogenesis of a Salmonella infection?

Fecal-oral entry 

Survive phagosome environment by producing nitrate transporter 

Neutralizes NO 

Colonize regional lymph nodes 

Systemic 

 

46

What toxins does Salmonella produce?

Enterotoxins 

Endotoxins 

Cytotoxins 

47

What can cause Peracute Salmonella septicemia?

Cholerasuis