Lecture 2: Science Of Behaviour Health And Development Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Lecture 2: Science Of Behaviour Health And Development Deck (19)
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What does good research consist of?

Theoretical framework:
Standard procedure:
Generalisbility:
Objective measurement:

1

What does a theoretical framework consist of?

Organising and explaining observations, and a hypothesis that fows

2

What does a standard procedure mean?

A procedure which is the same for all participants except the variable to test the hypothesis

3

What is generalisability?

The results should be representative of the population, the procedure should be sensible

4

What is an objective measurement allow?

Consistent results, valid measurements. E.g. Candidate has asthma if they have had more than x number of attacks within a certain period of time

5

What is an experiment an effect of?

Independent and dependent variable

6

What are the 6 components of an experiment?

1 hypothesis
2 identify variables
3 method
4 sorting participants
5 results: statistical techniques
6 draw conclusions.

7

What are some issues with experiments? How can these be reduced?

Bias (reduced by placebo treatment, or by double blind studies)

8

What is a correlation study used for?

Finding casualties/explanations e.g. High blood pressure and habits to mange stress

Comparing beliefs, behaviours, abilities at one point in time

9

What types of correlation studies are there?

Cross sectional
Longitudinal
Naturalistic observations
Laboratory observations
Surveys

10

What is a naturalistic observation and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

Observe in natural setting - not controlled

+ collect natural data
- must wait for behaviour to occur naturally, this may take some time

11

What is a laboratory observation and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

Where you observe in a lab where extraneous variables can be controlled and specialised treatment can be used

+ better control of outside factors as more precise equipment can be used
- surroundings may affect results - skewed data

12

What is a case study and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

Where you observe one or a few subjects (people) for a long time

+ it is the only method available for weird cases
- may generalise results

13

What is a survey and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

Where you collect data using questionnaires/interviews, however the sample must be representative

+ can collect information regarding attitudes and beliefs
- subjects may lie or mislead, resulting in false data

14

What is a longitudinal study and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

A study which follows a subject over time to see their development/progress

+ we can see changes happen in the individual I.e. it's more precise
- takes time

15

What is a cross sectional study and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

A study where we can collect data from different people in different age groups at one point in time

+ it's fast
- we can't determine changes within an individual, so can have different results

16

What is cross cultural research?

A study which Determines whether findings apply to other cultures as well

Requires naturalistic observation, replication of experiments with people from different cultures and questionnaires

17

What are some ethical issues that may arise with research?

Informed consent
Deception
Foreseeable risks
Using children as subjects

18

What are some flaws in research?

Sampling bias
Placebo effects
Distortions in self report- not true representation
Experimenter bias- looking for certain results