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Anatomic pathology > Lymph Nodes > Flashcards

Flashcards in Lymph Nodes Deck (343)
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90

Kikuchi's disease: Typical presentation.

Cervical lymphadenopathy and fever.

91

Kikuchi's disease: Histologic phases.

Proliferative.

Necrotizing.

Resolution.

92

Kikuchi's disease: Histology of the proliferative phase (3).

Patchy nodal disease.

Paracortical expansion with immunoblasts, small lymphocytes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, histiocytes.

Single-cell necrosis and granular débris.

93

Kikuchi's disease: Histology of the necrotizing phase (4).

Extensive necrosis with karyorrhexis.

Immunoblasts and histiocytes surround necrosis.

Histiocytes with crescentic nuclei.

No neutrophils.

94

Kikuchi's disease: Histology of the resolution phase.

Many foamy macrophages.

95

Kikuchi's disease: Immunohistochemistry.

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are reactive for CD123.

Very few B cells outside the germinal centers.

96

Kikuchi's disease: Relationship to systemic lupus erythematosus (2).

Similar histologic features.

Some patients with Kikuchi's disease develop lupus.

97

Kikuchi's disease: Prognosis.

Usually self-limiting.

98

Lymphadenitis of Kawasaki's disease: Histology (3).

Widespread necrosis with many neutrophils.

Fibrin thrombi in small vessels.

Arteritis with fibrinoid necrosis.

99

Lymphadenitis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Presentation (2).

Lymph nodes are soft and nontender.

Occurs at the onset of the disease or during an exacerbation.

100

Lymphadenitis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Histology (5).

Edema, hemorrhage, and necrosis surrounded by histiocytes and immunoblasts.

May show many plasma cells.

May show hematoxylin bodies.

May show the Azzopardi phenomenon.

May show marked follicular hyperplasia.

101

Tuberculous lymphadenitis: Most common site.

Cervical lymph nodes.

102

Tuberculous lymphadenitis: Causes of abdominal disease (2).

Ingestion of sputum or milk infected by M. tuberculosis or M. bovis.

103

Tuberculous lymphadenitis: Type of granuloma.

Usually caseating but can be non-necrotizing.

104

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis: Causes (5).

Mycobacterium avium complex.

M. kansasii.

M. scrofulaceum.

M. malmöense.

M. haemophilum.

105

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis: Typical immunocompetent patient.

Child of 1 to 5 years.

106

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis: Typical site.

Submandibular nodes.

107

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis: Histology in the immunocompetent

Necrotizing and non-necrotizing granulomas with Langhans' -type giant cells.

108

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis: Histology in the immunocompromised (2).

Poorly organized aggregates of histiocytes.

Rare: Mycobacterial pseudotumor consisting of foamy and spindled histiocytes.

109

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis: Treatment in the immunocompetent.

Excision.

110

Leprosy: Countries of highest incidence.

Brazil.

Bangladesh.

India.

Indonesia.

Nigeria.

111

Lepromatous leprosy: Histology.

The paracortical area contains many foamy macrophages that are full of organisms.

112

Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lymph node: Infectious causes (3).

Atypical mycobacteria, Treponema pallidum, or EBV is detected in some cases.

113

Cat-scratch disease: Acquisition (3).

Flea bite.

Cat bite.

Cat scratch.

114

Cat-scratch disease: Presentation.

Tender nodes with overlying erythema.

115

Cat-scratch disease: Atypical presentation (3).

"B" symptoms.

Hepatosplenomegaly.

Abdominal lymphadenopathy.

116

Cat-scratch disease: Histology of the early stage (4).

Follicular hyperplasia.

Hyperplasia of monocytoid B cells.

Small foci of necrosis among monocytoid B cells.

Microabscesses in the germinal centers.

117

Cat-scratch disease: Histology of the late stage (2).

Large, stellate microabscesses.

Necrotizing granulomas with palisading histiocytes.

118

Bartonella henselae:

A. Typical locations in the lymph node (3).
B. Best stains (2).

A. Macrophages, endothelial cells, areas of necrosis.

B. Warthin-Starry, Steiner's.

119

Cat-scratch disease: Other methods of diagnosis (3).

Serology.

Culture.

PCR.