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Anatomic pathology > Skin > Flashcards

Flashcards in Skin Deck (352)
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Dermatophytosis: The "sandwich sign".

Fungal hyphae between the parakeratotic layer and the overlying orthokeratosis.

1

Vitiligo: Typically spared areas (2).

Scalp and eyelashes.

2

Urticarial vasculitis:

A. Clinical features (3).
B. Duration of urticaria.

A. Recurrent urticaria, arthralgia, abdominal pain.

B. More than 24 hours.

3

Urticarial vasculitis: Histology.

Leukocytoclastic vasculitis without significant fibrin in vascular walls.

4

Urticarial vasculitis: Useful adjunctive laboratory tests (2).

Complement studies (CH50, C1q-binding assays).

DFA: May show vascular deposits of complement, immunoglobulins, or fibrin.

5

Urticarial vasculitis: Clinical associations (3).

Infectious hepatitis.

Infectious mononucleosis.

Autoimmune diseases.

6

Telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans: Histologic differences from urticaria (2).

Mast cells rather than eosinophils.

No significant dermal edema.

7

Lichen planus: Microbiological association.

Hepatitis C.

8

Lichen planus: Anatomic predilection of lesions (3).

Flexor surfaces.

Lower back.

Glans penis.

9

Oral lichen planus: Histologic differences from lichen planus of skin (3).

Parakeratosis.

Less epidermal hyperplasia.

Frequent ulceration.

10

Lichenoid drug eruption: Histologic differences from lichen planus (2).

Parakeratosis.

Eosinophils (sometimes).

11

Lichen striatus:

A. Age group.
B. Clinical appearance.

A. Children.

B. Unilateral eruption on extremities, trunk, neck.

12

Lichen striatus: Histologic differences from lichen planus.

Inflammatory infiltrate deep in reticular dermis around hair follicles and sweat glands.

13

Lichen nitidus:

A. Age group.
B. Clinical appearance.

A. Children.

B. Small, flat-topped papules.

14

Lichen nitidus: Histologic differences from lichen planus (4).

"Ball-in-claw" infiltrate.

Focal parakeratosis.

Epidermal atrophy.

Many histiocytes.

15

Lichen planopilaris vs. alopecia areata: Histology (2).

Lichen planopilaris: Infiltrate at base of follicular bulb; scarring.

Alopecia areata: Infiltrate along infundibulum; usually no scarring.

16

Erythema multiforme:

A. Infectious cause.
B. Pharmacological cause.

A. HSV.

B. Sulfonamides.

17

Toxic epidermal necrolysis: Drugs that cause it (3).

Sulfonamides.

β-lactam antibiotics.

NSAIDs.

18

Erythema multiforme: Histological feature of late lesion.

Dermal melanophages.

19

Erythema multiforme: Immunofluorescence.

IgM and C3 in the walls of superficial dermal vessels.

20

Angioedema: Histology.

Extension of the edema into the subcutis.

21

Acute GVHD:

A. Timing.
B. Clinical triad.

A. Within 3 months after transplant.

B. Rash, diarrhea, liver dysfunction.

22

Acute GVHD: Grade I.

Vacuolar change in basement membrane.

23

Acute GVHD: Grade II.

Necrotic keratinocytes, satellite necrosis.

24

Acute GVHD: Grade III.

More widespread necrosis of keratinocytes; separation at dermoepidermal junction.

25

Acute GVHD: Grade IV.

Full-thickness necrosis and loss of epidermis.

26

Chronic GVHD: Early phase.

Lichenoid, resembling lichen planus; satellite necrosis may be seen.

27

Chronic GVHD: Late phase.

Sclerosis, resembling scleroderma, but with epidermal atrophy.

28

Discoid lupus: Histology (4).

Hyperkeratosis with follicular plugging.

Epidermal atrophy.

Basal vacuolar change.

Thickened basement membrane.

29

Verrucous lesions of lupus: Histology (2).

Epidermal hyperplasia, papillomatosis.