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Flashcards in Psych -final Deck (115)
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1

a person's ability to adapt to the environment and learn from experience

intelligence

2

a subarea of psychology that develops psychological tests that assess an individual’s abilities, skills, beliefs, and personality traits in a wide range of settings

psychometrics

3

reported to have measured intelligence in an objective way. One of the first to use the psychometric approach.

charles spearman

4

intelligence has a general mental ability factor, g, that represents what different cognitive tasks have in common (one # defines how smart you are)

general intelligence theory

5

rejected the idea that a single # can tell us our intelligence. We actually have many difference kinds of intelligence...

howard gardner

6

there are at least nine different types of intelligence; verbal, musical, spatial, mathematical, movement, understanding self, understanding others, naturalistic, and existential. (gave you a number based on these, at least 9 numbers)

multiple intelligence theory

7

a better way to measure intelligence is to analyze three types of reasoning processes, being able to solve problems...

robert sternberg

8

intelligence can be divided into three reasoning processes: analytical, creative, and practical

triarchic theory

9

measured intelligence by the size of your head

francis galton

10

said the bigger the brain, the more intelligent the person

paul broca

11

: appointed to a committee to distinguish between normal children and intellectually deficient children (idiots, imbeciles, and morons). How can we easily measure a person’s ability to perform cognitive tasks?

alfred binet

12

items arranged in order of increasing difficulty. The items measured vocabulary, memory, common knowledge, and other cognitive abilities.

binet-simon intelligence scale

13

a measure that estimates a child’s intellectual progress by comparing the child’s score on an intelligence test ot the scores of average children the same age.

mental age

14

developed the Stanford-Binet intelligence Scale. Improved on the concept of mental age

lewis terman

15

mental age/chronological ageX100

IQ

16

a. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS)
b. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC)

examples of IQ tests

17

the test is measuring what it is supposed to measure(hitting the target)

validity of IQ tests

18

consistency...a person’s score on the test at one point in time should be similar to the score obtained at a later time

reliability of IQ tests

19

How far the scores are from the mean.

standard deviations

20

a statistical arrangement of scores where the vast majority of scores fall in the middle range and fewer falling near the extreme ends of the curve

normal distribution

21

the various physiological and psychological factors that cause us to act in a specific way at a particular time

motivation

22

3 characteristics of motivation

1. You are energized to engage in some activity
2. You direct your energy toward reaching a specific goal
3. You have different intensities of feelings about reaching that goal

23

humans are motivated by a variety of tendencies or biological forces that determine behavior.

instinct approach

24

we are motivated to seek out activities that provide a level of stimulation that allows us to maintain our optimal level of arousal

arousal theory

25

performance on a task is an interaction between the level of physiological arousal and the difficulty of the task

yerkes-dodson law

26

someone who needs more arousal than the normal person

sensation seeker

27

motivation to perform an activity occurs because the reward/pleasure center in the brain has been stimulated (nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area). We feel good when eating, gambling, drugs, sex.

reward/pleasure center approach

28

neurotransmitter involved in pleasure.

dopamine

29

as we aim to fulfill our basic needs, we experience different types of motivation

self-determination theory

30

goals that can be either objects or thoughts that we learn to value and that we are motivated to obtain

incentive