Psychology Module 22 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Psychology Module 22 Deck (26):
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A.

Factors in Mental Disorders

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1. A prolonged or recurring problem that seriously interferes with an individuals ability to live a satisfying personal life and function in society is a A. The definition takes into account genetic, behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors, all of which may contribute to a mental disorder.

A. Mental Disorder

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2. Mental disorders arise from the interaction of a number of factors. Biological factors include inherited behavioral tendencies, which are called A. Factors. These factors contribute from 30 to 60% to the development of mental disorders. Biological factors also include the overreaction of brain structures to certain stimuli, which are called B. Factors. Other factors that contribute to the development of mental disorders, such as deficits or problems in thinking, processing emotional stimuli, and social skills, are called C. Factors. Being in or seeing a traumatic event, which is called an D. Factor, can contribute to developing a mental disorder such as PTSD.

A. Genetic B. Numerological C. Cognitive emotional behavioral D. Environmental

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3. If a behavior is considered abnormal because it occurs infrequently in the general population, we are using a definition based on A. Frequency. If a behavior is considered abnormal because it deviates greatly from what's acceptable, we are using a definition based on B. If a behavior is considered abnormal because it interferes with an individual's ability to function as a person or in society, we are using a definition based on C. Behavior.

A. Statistical B. Social norms C. Maladaptive

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B.

Assessing mental disorders

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4. A systematic evaluation of an individual’s various psychological, biological, and social factors that may be contributing to his or her problem is called a A. The primary method used in clinical assessment is to get information about a person's background, current behavior, attitude, and emotions and also detail of present problems through a B. A complete clinical assessment usually includes three major method C.,,.

A clinical assessment B. Clinical interview C. Clinical interview, psychological tests, neurological tests

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5. Assessing mental disorders may be difficult because A. Vary in intensity and complexity. The assessment must take into account past and present problems and current stressors. The accurate assessment of symptoms is important because it has significant implications for the kind of B. That the client will be given.

A. Symptoms B. Treatment

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C.

Diagnosing mental disorders

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6. When mental health professional determine whether an individual’s specific problem me or matches the standard symptoms that define a particular mental disorder, they are making a A. In trying to reach an agreement on the clinical diagnosis, mental health professionals use a set of guidelines developed by the American psychiatric Association, which are called the B., Abbreviated as DSM – IV – TR.

A. Clinical diagnosis B. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders – IV – TR

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7. The DSM-IV – TR is a set of guidelines that uses five different dimensions or A. To diagnose mental disorders. The advantage of being DSM – IV – TR is that's it helps mental health professionals communicate their findings, conduct research, and plan for treatment. One disadvantage of using the DSM – IV – TR to make a diagnosis is that it places people into specific categories that may have bad associations; this problem is called B.

A. Axes B. Labeling

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D.

anxiety disorders

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8. A mental disorder that is marked by excessive and/or unrealistic worry or feelings of general apprehension about events or activities, when those feelings occur on a majority of days for a period of at least six months, is called A. This anxiety disorder is treated with some form of psychotherapy and/or drugs known as benzodiazepines.

A generalized anxiety

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9. One mental disorder is characterized by recurring and unexpected panic attack and continued worry about having another panic attack; such worry interferes with psychological functioning. This problem is called a A. Disorder.

A. Panic

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10. Supposed to experience a period of intense fear or discomfort in which four or more of the following symptoms are present: pounding heart, sweating, trembling, shortness of breath, feeling of choking, chest pain, nausea, feeling dizzy, and fear of losing control or dying. You are having a A. Panic disorders are treated with a combination of benzodiazepines or antidepressant and B.

A. Panic attack B. Psychotherapy

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11. Another anxiety disorder characterized by increased physiological arousal and an intense, excessive, and irrational fear that is out of all proportion to the danger elicited by the object or situation is called a A.

A. Phobia

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12. DSM – IV – TR divides phobias into three categories. Those that are triggered by common objects, situations, or animals (such as snakes or height) are called A. Phobias. Those that are brought on by having to perform in social situations and expecting to be humiliated and embarrassed are called B. Phobias. Those that are characterized by fear of being in public places from which it may be difficult or embarrassing to escape if panic symptoms occur are called C. Once established, phobias are extremely persistent, continue for years, and may require professional treatment.

A. Pacific B. Social C. Agoraphobia

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13. Persistent, recurring irrational thoughts that a person is unable to control and that interfere with normal functioning are called A. Irresistible impulse of to perform some ritual over and over, even though the ritual serves no rational purpose, are called B. A disorder that consists of both of these behaviors and that interferes with normal functioning is called C. The most effective nondrug treatment for excessive – compulsive disorder is D. Therapy

A. Of sessions B. Compulsions C. Of excessive – compulsive disorder D. Exposure

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E.

somatoform disorders

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14. The appearance of real physical symptoms and bodily complaints that are not under voluntary control, have no known physical causes, extend over several years, and are believed to be caused by psychological factors is characteristic of A. Disorders. DSM – IV – TR lists seven kinds of somatoform disorders. The occurrence of multiple symptoms – including pain, gastrointestinal, sexual, and urological symptoms – that have no physical causes but are triggered by psychological problems or distress is referred to as B. Disorder; a disorder characterized by unexplained and significant physical symptoms or deficits that affect voluntary motor or sensory functions and that suggests a real neurological or medical problem is called a C. Disorder. A recent survey reported that somatoform disorders occur worldwide, although their symptoms may differ across cultures.

A. Somatoform B. Somatization C. Conversion

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F.

Cultural diversity: an Asian disorder

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15. A social phobia found in Asia, especially Japan, that is characterized by morbid fear of making eye to eye contact, blushing, giving off an offensive odor, having unpleasant or tense facial expression, or having trembling hands is called A. This phobia appears to result from Asian cultural and social influences that stressed the importance of showing proper behavior in public.

A.Taijin Kyofusho, or TKS

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G.

research focus: school shootings

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16. A method of investigation that involves an in depth analysis of the thoughts, feelings, beliefs, experiences, behaviors, or problems of a single individual is called a A. This method was used to decide if teenage school shooters have repetitive and persistent patterns of behavior that have been going on for at least a year and involved threats or physical harm to people or animals, destruction of property, being deceitful, or stealing. The symptoms to find a mental disorder that is called B.

A. Case study B. Conduct disorder

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H.

Application: treating phobias

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17. There are several different treatments for phobias. A nondrug treatment combines changing negative, unhealthy, or distorted thoughts and beliefs by substituting positive, healthy, and realistic ones and learning new skills to in group functioning; this treatment is called A. Therapy. Another therapy that gradually exposes the person to the real anxiety producing situations or object that he or she has been avoiding is called B. Therapy. Individuals who are unwilling or too fearful to be exposed to fearful situations or objects may choose drug therapy.

A cognitive – behavioral B. Exposure

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17. There are several different treatments for phobias. A nondrug treatment combines changing negative, unhealthy, or distorted thoughts and beliefs by substituting positive, healthy, and realistic ones and learning new skills to in group functioning; this treatment is called A. Therapy. Another therapy that gradually exposes the person to the real anxiety producing situations or object that he or she has been avoiding is called B. Therapy. Individuals who are unwilling or too fearful to be exposed to fearful situations or objects may choose drug therapy.

A benzodiazepines B. Relapse C. Memory