SDR L7 - Anatomy of the Pelvis II Flashcards Preview

SDR II > SDR L7 - Anatomy of the Pelvis II > Flashcards

Flashcards in SDR L7 - Anatomy of the Pelvis II Deck (49):
0

T

(T/F) The bladder is an abdominal organ for infants, but for adults it has descended into the pelvis

1

1) Internal Iliac
2) Internal Iliac

For both male and female bladders the arterial supply is from the vesicular branches of the (1) arteries and lymphatic drainage travels to the (2) nodes

2

1) Peritoneum/Body of Cervix
2) Pubic Bone
3) Cervix/Vagina
4) Urethra

The *female bladder* is bounded superiorly by the (1) and (1), anteriorly by the (2), posteriorly by the (3), and interiorly by the (4)

3

F (partially perineal and partially a pelvic structure)

(T/F) The urethra is partially a completely pelvic structure

4

1) Peritoneum/Sigmoid Colon
2) Pubic Bone
3) Rectum/Vas Deferens/Seminiferous Vessels
4) Prostate/Urethra

The male bladder is bounded superiorly by the (1) and (1), anteriorly by the (2), posteriorly by the (3), (3), and (3), and inferiorly by the (4) and (4)

5

1) Prostatic Urethra (~1.25 in)
2) Membranous urethra (~0.75 in)
3) Spong urethra (~6 in)

3 parts of the male urethra (proximal --> distal)

6

Spong

This part of the urethra passes beneath the pubic bone and is particularly susceptible to injury

7

Internal Sphincter Muscle

This structure prevents retrograde ejaculation of semen into the bladder, and there is no equivalent muscle in females

8

Prostatic Urethra

The 2 ejaculatory ducts and 15-20 prostatic ducts enter into this portion of the male urethra

9

TURP (Transurethral Resection of the Prostate)

This procedure is commonly performed to remove blockages in the male urethra near the prostate

10

Cystocele

Hernia of the urinary bladder

11

T

(T/F) During a TURP procedure the prostatic urethra gets resected and a new urethra forms around the inserted catheter

12

Suprapubic Cystotomy

If a patient cannot empty his or her bladder and catheterization is not an option, a (1) can be performed

13

F (Expansion of bladder lifts the perineum out of the way)

(T/F) Suprapubic Cystotomies can be performed with a low risk of peritoneal infection because the double fold in the perineum drains directly to aortic lymph nodes

14

T

(T/F) The vagina is considered both a pelvic organ and a perineal organ

15

Anterior, posterior, and two lateral
fornices

These are recesses that continuously surround the
cervix

16

Urethra

In females, this structure is considered embedded in the anterior vaginal wall

17

Uterus

Prolapse of this structure is common if the loose connective tissue between the rectum and vagina is
damaged

18

Pouch of Douglas

This peritoneal area is adajent to the upper ¼ of the posterior vaginal wall and it can be accessed via the posterior fornix

19

1) Internal Iliac
2) Uterine

Arterial supply to the vagina is supplied by the vaginal branch of the (1) artery and vaginal branch of the (2) artery

20

E) Urethra

Which of the following structures does not pass laterally to the vagina?
A) Ovaries
B) Ischial Spine
C) Uterine Tubules
D) Ureters
E) Urethra
F) Uterine A.

21

1) Uterine A.
2) Ovarian A.

Aterial supply to the uterus is through these two arteries

22

1) Para-aortic
2) Internal Iliac
3) Superficial Inguinal

Lymphatic drainage from the uterus can be to
three locations. Superiorly to the (1) nodes, but also to the (2) and (3) nodes

23

Uterovesicular

Anteriorly the peritoneal recess is called the (1) pouch, and posteriorly it is called the pouch of Douglas

24

Broad Ligament

This structure is a fold of peritoneum draped over the uterus connecting the lateral sides of the uterus to the side walls of the pelvis

25

Round Ligaments

These ligaments pass from the side wall of the uterus through the inguinal canal to the labia majora

26

1) Cardinal L. (Cervix --> Side wall of pelvis)
2) Uterosacral L. (Cervix --> Sacrum)
3) Pubocervical Fascia (Cervix --> Pubic Bone)

These 3 connective tissues support the cervix at the base of the uterus

27

Intramural

This portion of the uterine tubes is within the wall of the uterus

28

Salpingitis

Inflammation of the fallopian tubes; can result in infertility

29

Hysterosalpingogram

Patency of uterine tubes is determined with a

30

Unicornuate uterus

Congenital malformation of the uterus that results in a uterus with one horn

31

1) Uterine
2) Ovarian

Arterial supply for the uterine tubes comes from the (1) and (2) arteries

32

1) Internal Iliac
2) Para-aortic

Lymphatic drainage for the uterine tubes travels to the (1) and (2) lymph nodes.

33

1) Suspensory Ligament of the Ovary (infundibulo-pelvic ligament)

Arterial supply to the ovary is via the ovarian artery (duh), which travels to the ovary within the

34

1) IVC
2) Left Renal V.
3) Para-aortic

The right ovarian vein dumps into the (1), while
the left ovarian vein dumps into the (2). Lymphatic drainage travels to the para-aortic nodes

35

T

(T/F) Ovaries shrink in size after menopause and are irreversibly carried superiorly in the broad ligament during pregnancies

36

1) upper 2/3 of vagina
2) most of uterus
3) bladder
4) urethra

These 4 parts of the female anatomy drain to the Iliac Nodes

37

1) lower 1/3 of vagina
2) part of upper uterus via round ligament
3) urethra

These 3 parts of the female anatomy drain to the Superficial Inguinal Nodes

38

1) fundus of uterus
2) ovaries
3) uterine tubes

These 3 parts of the female anatomy drain to the Para-aortic Nodes

39

1) Bladder
2) UGD
3) Pubic Bone
4) Rectum

The prostate is surrounded superiorly by the (1), inferiorly by the (2), anteriorly by the (3), and posteriorly by the (4)

40

Benign Prostatic *Hyperplasia*

BPH =

41

Ureter

Prostate cancer can eventually cause renal failure if
the this structure becomes invaded and impeded from the cancer

42

1) Internal Iliac
2) Internal Iliac

Arterial supply to the prostate is via the (1) artery and lymphatic drainage from the prostate travels to the (2) nodes

43

Vertebra

If cancer establishes metastasizes this structure, it can travel up into the skull because veins draining the region *do not have any valves*

44

Vas Deferens

This structure is a tube that leads from the testes to join with the prostatic urethra

45

Ductus Deferens

Vas Deferens aka

46

Seminal Vesicles

These structures are lobulated sacs found posterior to the bladder and prostate and anterior to the rectum. They secrete an alkaline fluid that composes semen (helps balance out acidic secretions in the vagina, so sperm can prosper)

47

Ejaculatory Duct

The vas deferens is called the (1) until it enters the prostatic urethra

48

*Prostate* and seminal vesicles

These two structures contribute most to the production of semen