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Hugh's MD2 Gen Med > Skin Cancer > Flashcards

Flashcards in Skin Cancer Deck (28):
1

Describe the general clinical features of an skin SCC?

Non-pigmented

Tender on palpation

Rapid growth (over weeks or months)

Skin is freely movable over underlying skull

+/- Hyperkeratotic nodule, bleeding, ulceration

2

What is more common SCC or BCC skin lesions?

BCC

3

Where are SCC typically found?

Sun exposed sights

 

4

What are the group of disorder that result from keratinocyte dysplasia?

Actinic keratosis

SCC in situ (Bowen's disease)

SCC

5

What is the time course of SCC development?

Weeks to months

6

How are SCC managed?

Surgery with borders of 5-10mm

Adjunct radiotherapy if required

 

Radiotherapy alone can be used if surgery is contraindicated

7

Describe the clinical features of a BCC?

Pearly nodules with telangectasia

Often centrally ulcerated

Indolent growth

In areas of high sun exposure

8

What are the histopathological features of BCC?

Pallisading

Basaloid cells with a pushing boarder invading into stroma

 

9

What type of BCC can mimic melanoma?

Nodular BCC

10

How do BCC spread?

Locally 

Rarely metastasize

11

How are BCC Mx?

Surgical excision - particular nodular or infiltrative

Serial curettage

Topical imiquimod

Photodynamic therapy

12

At what rate to actinic keratosis overgo malignant transformation to SCCs?

1:1000 per year

13

What must you be way of when examining actinic keratosis?

Hyperkeratotic, tender nodules that might be transformation in SCC

14

How are actinic keratosis managed?

Cyrotherapy

Topical agent eg 5FU, imiquinod

Surgical excision

15

What are the clinical features of Bowen's disease?

Scaly erythematous plaques with some surface erosions

May be itchy, painful and bleed

16

How is Bowen disease Mx?

Topical therapies - eg 5FU, imiquimod

Surgical excision

17

What is imiquimod?

Local immune stimulator used to treat superficial viral infections and tumours

18

Where is Bowen disease classically found?

Legs - shins

19

How can you divide naevi?

Congenital

Acquired

20

What are you worried about with congenital naevi?

Malignant transformation - larger ones more likely

Cosmetic

21

What are the characteristics of a benign junctional naevus?

Occurs of the epidermal side of the DEJ

Macular - Slightly raised

<1cm

Uniform colour

22

What are the characteristics of a compound benign naevus?

Cell in the both the epidermis and dermis

<1cm diameter

Papules or Nodules

Even colour and smooth border

23

What are the characteristics of a benign intradermal naevus?

All intradermal

Paler colour

Papular or nodule

Small, later onset

Smooth surface

 

24

What are lentigines?

Papules of increased pigmentation due to increased melanocytes

On sun exposured sites

Static with time

25

What are seborrheic keratosis? What do they look like?

Benign lesions of elderly people due to keratinocyte proliferation

Warty, macular appearance

Can be pigmented and increase in size

26

What are the clinical features of dysplastic naevi?

Larger >5mm lesions

Smudged border

More than 2 colours

Atypical pigment on dermatoscope

Generally still symmetrical

27

When should dysplastic naevi be removed?

If they are suspicious for transformation to melanoma

Not prophylactically

28