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Flashcards in Use and Misuse Deck (95)
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1

What wrong with this:

Each girl on the team tied their shoes with blue laces.

pronoun and antecedent don't agree. 

Should be

Each girl on the team tied HER shoes with blue laces.

because we are talking about EACH ONE.

2

Name 5 indefinite pronouns? Are they singular or plural?

Singular: nobody, no one, none, somebody, anybody

technically singular, but increasingly paired with plural pronouns 

None of the passengers saved THEMSELVES.

 

3

Name 1 indefinite pronoun that can be plural or singular.

SOME

Some of my friends made peanut butter sandwiches for themselves.

Some of this tuna smells like it barfed on itself.

4

Collective nouns are often a source of what issue?

Subject/verb agreement.

When speaking of collective noun as a whole, treat as singular

The team is the best in the national league.

When the collective noun itself is plural, use the plural.

The Mets are the best team in the major leagues.

5

Identify the subject in

There are a thousand reasons to be precise in your language.

and

There is a gray cat sitting in the yard.

Reasons

Cat

There is serving as a "function of introduction." 

When you see "there" at the beginning of a sentence, flip to sentence around to find the subject.

6

What are COPULATIVE VERBS?

State of being verbs

to be, to become, to appear, to seem, to sound, to feel, etc.

7

What are copulative verbs followed by?

ADJECTIVES (or phrases servings as adjectives) ... that describe the subject's state.

Copulative: He always has to be different.

Action: She acted differently than the last time I met her.

8

What is the difference between who and whom?

  • WHO is a subject pronoun
  • WHOM is an object pronoun

9

There was at least one more person (who, whom) Redpath knew felt the same way.

WHO

"Who is the subject of the clause "who felt the same way."

10

How do you tell if who or whom is called for in a sentence?

  • substitute he/him
  • turn the sentence around to see what who/whom stands for

I am the one who said that. (Who said that?)

Whom shall I call? (I’ll call him.)

11

What part of speech is there?

Pronoun or Adverb

Turn there and you’ll see it on the left. (adverb)

There we go! (adverb)

There will come a time when all this makes sense. (pronoun)

12

What part of speech is "their"?

possessive adjectival pronoun

They put their hands in their pockets.

13

What part of speech is "they're"?

contraction on "they are

They're the best of the lot.

14

What is the difference between FARTHER and FURTHER?

  • FARTHER refers to DISTANCE (think of FAR!)
  • FURTHER refers to DEGREE 

I walked farther than I ever had.

I'd like to explore that point further.

15

What is the difference between LESS and FEWER?

  • LESS is used for MEASURABLE items—mass nouns, bulk or collective items
  • FEWER is used for COUNTABLE items

I have three apples. You have two. You have fewer.

Use less flour for this recipe. 

16

What is the difference between EACH OTHER and ONE ANOTHER

  • EACH OTHER - for reciprocal relationships between two
    • All the guests brought gifts for one another.

  • ONE ANOTHER - for reciprocal relationships between three or more
    • He and his brother love each other.

17

Distinguish between AFFECT and EFFECT.

  • AFFECT — a verb, meaning "to influence"
    • The medicine did not affect him.

 

  • EFFECT — a noun, meaning "result" or a verb, meaning "to bring about"
    • The medicine had no side effects.
    • He strives to effect change in public policy.

18

What's the difference between lie and lay?

  • TO LIE — a intransitive verb meaning "to recline"
    • I lie on the bed.

 

  • TO LAY — a  transitive verb meaning "to put" or "to place"
    • I lay the book on the table.

19

What is the first person past tense of "to lie"?

LAY

I lay on the bed.

20

What is the difference between "into" and "in to"?

  • Into = preposition meaning "from outside to inside"
    • He walked INTO the classroom.

 

  • In to = adverb + preposition or infinitve
    • He walked in to tell the class about the program.

21

What does "due to" mean?

"caused by"

it does NOT mean

"because of"

22

Correct or incorrect?

The game was postoned DUE TO rain.

incorrect.

Correct would be 

The game's postponement was DUE TO rain

Remember: only use DUE TO when you could substitute CAUSED BY

23

Only use DUE TO when it can be substituted with ...

CAUSED BY

24

What distinguishes BRING vs TAKE?

The DIRECTION of the ACTION

BRING: Action is toward someplace else. The reference point is elsewhere

I will bring her with me to the party

TAKE: Action is away from where you are. The reference point is here. 

She plans to take one suitcase with her to London

25

The social workers went to the house to (bring/take) the frail old woman to a nursing home.

Answer: TAKE

 

"Take" is used for movement that is NOT toward the speaker or writer; use "bring" to indicate action toward the speaker/writer. [Source: ACES]

26

The bell rang on the hour (continually/continuously) all night long.

Answer: CONTINUALLY

"Continual" means over and over again; "continuous" means uninterrupted.

27

So (reluctant, reticent) has Albert been about marriage that his father sought changes to the constitution three years ago to let the crown pass to a princess if Albert abdicates or dies without a child. 

Answer: RELUCTANT

"Reluctant" means hesitant to take actions; "reticent" means reluctant to speak. 

28

Joe Levy of the International Tanning Association (rebuts, refutes) the claims of dermatologists' association and calls North Carolina's law a waste of time.

Answer: REBUTS

"Rebuts" means to argue with someone else's argument; "refute" means to prove an argument incorrect. [ACES]

29

But after almost two months after the rules took (affect, effect), just such a capitalist brawl is breaking out in fron of the courthouse on Fayetville Street. 

EFFECT

The correct expression is "took effect," meaning became effective.

30

The animals (constitute, comprise) the Texas Camel Corps, Baum's tribute to an almost forgotten chapter of the state's history...

CONSTITUTE

Remeber: The whole comprises the parts; the parts consitute the whole.