Adenovirus Flashcards Preview

Pulmonary Micro > Adenovirus > Flashcards

Flashcards in Adenovirus Deck (33):
1

What type of infections can Adv cause?

respiratory, eye, and GI tract infections

2

How long can the virus be shed?

for months

3

where can the virus be shed from?

primarily lymphoid tissues such as tonsils, adenoids, and Peyer's patches

4

Adv infection of epithelial cells can lead to what?

significant necrosis and inflammation

5

What are characteristics of Adv?

double-stranded linear DNA genome packaged in an icosahedral capsid w/out an envelope

6

What are Adv's exceptionally stable against?

detergents and many other chemicals and physical agents allow them to survive for prolonged periods outside the body. resistant to low pH environment of GI tract

7

What are the 100 serotypes defined by?

capsid's penton protein

8

What is a penton protein?

a spike-like protein found at each of the icosahedron's corner.

9

What is the function of a penton?

attachement proteins of the virus and responsible for toxic effect on cells.

10

How can one acquire immunity against a particular serotype?

production of penton-specific antibodies

11

What do Adv hexon proteins do?

produce complement fixing antibodies that don't provide immunity but are useful in IDing an Adv infection

12

What diseases are caused by Adv?

pharyngitis, pharyngoconjunctival fever, croup, pneumonia, ARD, conjunctivitis, epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, acute gastroenteritis, obesity?!

13

What happens in the acute phase of infection?

initial replication at site of infection causes cell necrosis and inflammation

14

What happens after the acute phase?

Adv may persist w/out causing disease in tonsils, adenoids, or Peyer's patches and be shed for 6-18 months

15

Who is at greatest risk for respiratory infections and acute febrile disease

young children, less than 3 year olds; military recruits

16

How can one get eye infections from Adv?

contaminated swimming pools or contaminated ophthalmic medicines

17

What is a classic presentation of Adv infection?

pharyngoconjunctival fever, a combination of pharyngitis and ocular infection

18

What serotypes cause GI infections? in whom?

40 and 41, in young kids

19

What is the main organism that causes GI infections?

rotavirus

20

What are serotypes 36 and 37 linked to?

OBESITY!

21

What are symptoms for a respiratory Adv infection?

cough, fever, sore throat, runny nose, watery eyes

22

What are the symptoms for an ocular Adv infection?

sand in the eye, runny nose, fever, sore throat

23

What are the symptoms for a GI Adv infection?

diarrhea, vomiting, fever, nausea, blood in urine

24

How is Adv transmitted?

inhalation of water droplets; by fecal-oral route, or by direct inoculation

25

What serotypes are endemic and cause infections in very young kids?

1, 2, 3, 5

26

When do most endemic infections occur?

in late winter or early spring

27

What serotype is ARD assoicated w/

4 and 7

28

How does one Dx Adv?

culture samples (throat or conjunctival swabs, mouth washings, urine, or feces) and clinical presentation

29

How can one confirm serotypes of Adv?

- penton-specific immunofluroescent antibodies
- hemagglutination inhibition assays
- antibodies to Adv hexon proteins in complement fixation assays confirm infection but not specific serotypes

30

What does confirmation of an Adv infection entail of?

a comparison of acute and convalescent sera, look for a 4- fold rise in convalescent titer

31

What is the treatment for Adv?

none, try to treat the symptoms

32

Is there a vaccine?

attenuated, live vaccine given to military personnel

33

What is the vaccine made up of?

encapsulates serotypes 4 and 7 which allows for their enteric release, produces a subclinical infection in GI tract to promote immunity