Respiratory Bacterial Zoonose Flashcards Preview

Pulmonary Micro > Respiratory Bacterial Zoonose > Flashcards

Flashcards in Respiratory Bacterial Zoonose Deck (45):
1

How is plague (Yersinia Pestis) transmitted?

via a vector, the flea and in the pneumonic form can be transmitted human to human

2

How is Brucellosis acquired?

direct contact w/ animals or by consumption of unpasteurized dairy products

3

How is Q fever acquired?

inhalation of animal aerosols

4

T or F. Brucellosis and Q fever be transmitted from human to human?

False

5

What is the most common natural form of plague?

bubonic plague

6

Where is Yp found in the US?

New Mexico and adjoining states and some Rocky Mountain States to the north

7

What are the keys to the Dx for Yp?

History
Large swollen painful nodes
Failure to respond to beta-lactam and macrolides

8

Is plague pneumonia fatal? contagious?

yes and yes!

9

How does one acquire primary plague pneumonia?

from a person or a cat w/ plague pneumonia

10

Yp.. negative or positive?

negative

11

What does Yp look like?

rods w/ bipolar inclusion bodies ... safety pins

12

What can Yp grow on?

BAP and enteric media

13

What are the virulence factors of Yp?

type 3 secretion system injects effectors into host cells -- paralyze phagocytes and suppress the immune response, F1 protein Ag capsule

14

What are symptoms of Bubonic plague?

swollen painful axial or inguinal, femoral lymph nodes (buboes), fever, chills, headache, possible nausea, vomiting, prostration

15

What are the symptoms of septicemic plague?

w/ or w/out buboes, severe toxemia and general organ system failure, vomiting, diarrhea, petechiae to extreme DIC

16

What are the symptoms of Pneumonic plague?

Secondary - productive sputum more bloody and watery than purulent, necrotic, septic
Primary - symptoms same as secondary but before septicemia.

17

What should be done for a secondary pneumonic plague?

requires isolation of pt and prophylaxis for all exposed individuals

18

What is the DDx for a pt including w/ a bubo?

1. tularemia
2. chancroid - no sepsis, less local pain, and recent history of sexual contact and genital lesions.
3. Lymphogranuloma venereum
4. strep, staph adenitis - should be less septic and the lymph node, purulent association
5. Cat scratch disease - indolent course

19

What suggest Yp?

Gram negative rods in sputum of an otherwise immunocompetent pt

20

Where is natural plague contracted?

where silvatic plaque exists - entirely west of Mississippi and narrow range in west

21

How can one Dx plague?

serological - based on Abs to F1 surface protein Ag
Gram stains of buboes, sputum, blood - safety pins
Culture
IF test
New RADT

22

What is the Rx for plague?

gentamicin, streptomycin, doxy, cipro.

23

What is the post-exposure (pneumonic) treatment for plague?

doxy for 7 days

24

What can Brucellosis be found in?

cows, pigs, sheep and goats

25

Brucellosis - negative or positive? aerobic or anerboic? shape?

negative aerboic coccobacillus

26

It Brucellosis and intracellular or extraceullar parasite and of what system?

facultative IC of the RES

27

How long does it take to culture Brucellois?

one week on rich medium

28

What is another name of Brucellosis?

undulant fever

29

What type of infection does Brucellosis cause?

slow, moving chronic infection but initial infection can be acute (flu symptoms w/ high fever)

30

What are symptoms of Brucellosis?

relapsing fever, night sweats, weakness, back ache, wt loss, fatigue
- dry cough, pleuritic pain

31

What is the typical lesion on biopsy of bone or liver for a Brucellosis infection?

a granuloma

32

Where can Brucellosis spread?

bones (lower vertebrae), liver, heart, GI, and genitourinary tracts

33

Who is at risk for Brucellosis?

1. people handling animals or animal viscera
2. consumers of raw milk, unpasteurized cheese

34

Is there any human -human transmission for Brucellosis?

no

35

How does one Dx Brucellosis?

serological, culture on rich media (bone marrow)

36

What is the treatment for Brucellosis?

prolonged course of antibiotics (doxy plus an aminoglycoside)

37

What is Q fever caused by?

Coxiella Burneti (Cb)

38

What type of parasite is Q fever?

obligate IC that infects animals

39

Cb -- positive or negative? where does it replicate?

negative bacillus. phagolysosomes

40

What are the symptoms for Q fever?

1/3 to 1/2- asymptomatic, acute febrile illness, sometimes liver/heart involvement, endocariditis

41

How is Q fever transmitted?

via aerosol, handling viscera, or drinking raw milk, and at times by ticks

42

What is the animal reservoir for Q fever?

cow, sheep, goat

43

How does Q fever infect animals?

has a spore-like form that distributes miles by wind --- Catergory B

44

How does one Dx Q fever?

high or rising Ab titers to Q fever Ag

45

What is the treatment for Q fever?

most infections spontaneously resolve but doxy Rx can shorten duration and reduce risk for chronic infection