Airport Operations Flashcards Preview

102 > Airport Operations > Flashcards

Flashcards in Airport Operations Deck (60)
1

What is a civil airport?

Airports that are open to the general
public.

2

What is a Private Airport?

Airports designated for private or restricted use only, not open to the general public

3

What are Military/Federal Government airports?


Airports operated by the military, National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA), or other agencies of
the Federal Government.

4

Sources of Airport Data?

• Aeronautical Charts
• Airport/Facility Directory (AFD)
• Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs)

5

Towered Airport:
Do you need two-way communication with ATC?
Do you need to comply with all clearances?
In what cases can you deviate from clearances?
What must you ask for to deviate from instruction?

Yes, two-way communication with ATC must be kept.

You do need to comply with all clearances.

If clearances can not be complied you must ask from amended clearance or must be in an emergency. If an emergency occurs notify ATC as soon as possible.

6

Non-towered Airports:
Who do you speak to?

Speak to traffic on CTAF to indicate

7

What does CTAF stand for?

Common Traffic Advisory Frequency

8

What does UNICOM stand for?

Universal Integrated Community

9

What is UNICOM?

UNICOM is a nongovernment air/ground radio communication station which may provide airport information at public use airports
where there is no tower or FSS.

10

What does FSS stand for?

Flight Service Station

11

At Pilot Request UNICOM can provide...

-weather information
-wind direction
-recommended runway
-other necessary information

12

UNICOM (no tower or FSS):

Frequency Use:
Outbound Communication Procedure:
Inbound Communication Procedure:
Practice Instrument Approach:

Frequncy Use:
Communicate with UNICOM
station on published CTAF
frequency (122.7, 122.8, 122.725, 122.975, or 123.0).
If unable to contact UNICOM station, use self-announce
procedures on CTAF.

Outbound:
Before taxiing and
before taxiing on the
runway for departure.

Inbound:
10 miles out.
Entering downwind,
base, and final.
Leaving the runway

Practice: None

13

No Tower, Unicom, or FSS:

Frequency Use:
Outbound Communication Procedure:
Inbound Communication Procedure:
Practice Instrument Approach:

Frequency Use:
Self-announce on MULTICOM frequency 122.9.

Outbound Communication:
Before taxiing and
before taxiing on the
runway for departure

Inbound Communication:
Before taxiing and before taxiing on the runway for departure.

Practice Instrument Approach:
Departing final approach fix (name) or on final approach
segment inbound.

14

No Tower, FSS Open

Frequency Use:
Outbound Communication Procedure:
Inbound Communication Procedure:
Practice Instrument Approach:

Frequency Use:
Communicate with FSS on CTAF
frequency

Outbound Communication:
Before taxiing and
before taxiing on the
runway for departure

Inbound Communication:
10 miles out.
Entering downwind,
base, and final.
Leaving the runway

Practice Instrument Approach:
Approach completed/terminated.

15

FSS Closed (no tower)

Frequency Use:
Outbound Communication Procedure:
Inbound Communication Procedure:
Practice Instrument Approach:

Frequency Use:
Self-announce on CTAF.

Outbound Communication:
Before taxiing and
before taxiing on the
runway for departure

Inbound Communication:
10 miles out.
Entering downwind,
base, and final.
Leaving the runway

Practice Instrument Approach:
None

16

Tower of FSS not in operation:

Frequency Use:
Outbound Communication Procedure:
Inbound Communication Procedure:
Practice Instrument Approach:

Frequency Use:
Self-announce on CTAF.

Outbound Communication:
Before taxiing and
before taxiing on the
runway for departure

Inbound Communication:
10 miles out.
Entering downwind,
base, and final.
Leaving the runway

Practice Instrument Approach:
None

17

Mandatory Instruction Signs

Red background with white inscription.

These signs denote an entrance to a
runway, critical area, or prohibited area.

Co-located with Hold Short Lines

18

Location Signs

Black with yellow inscription and a
yellow border, no arrows.

They are used to identify a
taxiway or runway location, to identify the boundary
of the runway, or identify an instrument landing
system (ILS) critical area

19

Direction Signs

Yellow background with black
inscription.

The inscription identifies the designation
of the intersecting taxiway(s) leading out of an
intersection.

20

Destination Signs

Yellow background with black
inscription and also contain arrows.

These signs
provide information on locating things, such as
runways, terminals, cargo areas, and civil aviation
areas.

21

Information Signs

Yellow background with black
inscription.

These signs are used to provide the pilot
with information on such things as areas that cannot
be seen from the control tower, applicable radio
frequencies, and noise abatement procedures. The
airport operator determines the need, size, and location
of these signs

22

Runway Distance Remaining Signs

Black background with white numbers.

The numbers indicate the distance of the remaining runway in thousands of feet.

23

AIRPORT BEACONS:

What do they do?
When are they operated?
What special circumstances are they turned on?

-Airport beacons help a pilot identify an airport at night.

-The beacons are operated from dusk till dawn.

-Sometimesthey are turned on if the ceiling is less than 1,000 feet and/or the ground visibility is less than 3 statute miles (VFR minimums).

24

Types of Airports (2)

Controlled – have at least a part time operating control tower

Uncontrolled - no operating control tower

25

Runways

What color are surface markings?

What identifies runways?
What are the identification markings based on?


All runway surface markings are white

Runways are identified using numbers:

•Based on magnetic heading of runway rounded to the nearest ten

•Position of runways can be further defined by using “L” (Left), “R” (Right), “C” (Center)

•Most runways have specific obstacle clearance requirements

•Runways are stressed to handle the impact of the aircraft touchdown

26

Types of Runway Markings

Visual Runway Markings:

Non-Precision Markings:

Precision Markings:

27

CLOSED RUNWAYS

Permanently Closed:

Temporarily Closed:

Permanently Closed:
Yellow “X” placed at each approach end of the runway and at 1000’ intervals

Temporarily Closed:
Yellow “X” placed at each approach end of the runway
-May be lighted

28

Taxiway Markings

What colors are the taxiway markings?

All taxiway markings are yellow

Identified by letters (A, B, C) or by Letter/Number combinations (A1, B2, C3)

29

Installed at taxiway/runway intersections

What markings are taxiway and which are runway?

•Solid Side – Taxiway
•Dashed Side - Runway

30

ILS Critical Area

What is it and why is it installed?
When do you hold short of it?

Installed to prevent interference with the operation of the Instrument Landing System (ILS)

Hold short of the line only when instructed to do so by ATC

31

Airport Signs

Where are they installed?
What do they indicate?

Installed at various points around an airport to indicate
•Location on Airport
•Location of Runways
•Direction
•General Information

32

Airport Beacon Colors and Meanings?
When do beacons show?

Civilian Land Airport: One Green One White
Water Airport: One Yellow One White
Military Airport: Two White One Green
Heliport: One White One Yellow One Green

Beacons show from sunset to sunrise.

33

Taxiway Edge Lighting color and direction?

Omnidirectional Blue

34

Taxiway Centerline Lighting Color and direction?

Unidirectional Green

35

Runway Edge Light Systems

What is their purpose?
Color?

What is the exception and where are these lights located?

•Allow for identification of runway edges
oWhite along the edge

•Exception – for instrument runways where the last 2,000’ are yellow to form a caution zone for landing
oGreen at threshold boundary
oRed at departure end

36

Runway End Identifier Lights (REIL)

•Flashing lights at the beginning of the runway

37

In-Runway Lighting

•Runway Centerline Lighting System (RCLS)
oWhite until last 3,000’

•At 3,000’, alternate red and white for the next 2,000 then remaining 1,000’ all red

38

Touchdown Zone Lights (TDZL) color?

White

Two Bars that run on the 500 foot markers to aid in where to touch down.

39

Taxiway Lead Off Lights color?

•Alternate green and yellow

40

Land and Hold Short Lights color?

•Flashing white across the runway intersection

41

What does provide mean?

Provide means to transition from instrument flight to visual flight for landing

42

Runway Guard Lights

Where are they and what do they do?
What color are they?

•Flashing yellow lights installed at either side of the taxiway or a row of in-pavement yellow lights installed across the entire taxiway
oInstalled to prevent Taxiway/Runway intersection incursions

43

Stop Bars

•Row of steady burning red lights and elevated red lights installed at runway holding positions

oStop bar lights are turned off when the aircraft is cleared across

oNever cross a red illuminated stop bar even if an ATC clearance is received

44

Clearance Bar

oThree in-pavement steady burning yellow lights
•Taxiway intersections

45

VASI

Visual Approach Slope Indicator

•Provides obstacle clearance within 4 NM of the runway threshold within 10 degrees of centerline

46

PAPI

Precision Approach Path Indicator

47

Visual Glide-slope Indicator Types (4)

VASI
PAPI
Tri-Color Systems
Pulsating Systems

48

AWOS and ASOS

Automated Weather Observation Station
Automated Surface Observation Station

•Automated Weather
•Frequencies found on sectional chart

49

ATIS

Automatic Terminal Information Service
•Available at towered airports
oWeather
oActive Runways
oNOTAMS
oFrequency Information
oSpecial Information

50

Pilot Controlled Lighting

Uncontrolled Airports
•Clicking the mic switch on the appropriate frequency

•7 Clicks – highest intensity
oIdentify the airport
oDo this with other pilots in mind
•5 Clicks – medium intensity
•3 Clicks – low intensity

51

Operation Lights On

Turn on landing light during takeoff, either after takeoff clearance is received or when beginning takeoff roll

When operating within 10 miles of any airport

Enhances see and avoid concept

52

Aircraft Lights 91.209

From sunset to sunrise you must:

•Operate position lights (navigation lights)

•Operate anti-collision lights (strobe lights), unless, in the interest of safety, you determine they should be turned off

53

What is the direction of the traffic pattern?
STANDARD?
NONSTANDARD? (2)

Where can information be found? (2)

•Standard (LEFT)

•Nonstandard (RIGHT)

•Information can be found
oSectional
oA/FD

54

Pattern Entry (2)

•Overfly airport if necessary
•Enter 45 degree to the downwind, midfield

55

Departing

Departing:
•Controlled
•Uncontrolled
•Noise Abatement
•Other Established Procedures

56

91.113 Right of Way Rules

-When able, all pilots must see and avoid other aircraft

-When another aircraft ahs the right of way, you must yield and pass well clear of the other aircraft

-An aircraft in distress has the right of way over all other air traffic

57

91.113 Right of Way Converging Rules

Aircraft of the same category converging, the aircraft to the other’s right has the right of way.

•Balloon
•Glider
•Airship
•Aircraft towing or re-fueling

When approaching head on, each aircraft shall alter course to the right

58

91.113 Right of Way Landing Rules

Aircraft landing have the right of way over other aircraft in the air or on the surface

•Two aircraft approach to land, the lower one has the right of way

oDo NOT take advantage of this rule

59

Land and Hold Short Operations (LAHSO)

LAHSO is a clearance to land and stop prior to a predetermined point (typically a runway)

LAHSO clearances will be offered by ATC without request by the PIC, however the PIC must accept the clearance

Pilots should read back their LAHSO clearance and include the words “HOLD SHORT OF RUNWAY ___”

ATIS will normally indicate if LAHSO is in effect along with runway length for LAHSO runways

60

Exiting After Landing:

What is expected of you when landing and exiting?
Who will advise you where to turn off and will they always?
If ATC provides runway instruction can you exit another?
What must you cross to be clear of runway?

It is expected that aircraft will exit the runway as soon as practical at the first available taxiway

•ATC will not necessarily advise you at which taxiway to turn off at

•DO NOT exit onto another runway unless directed by ATC

•Taxi past and clear the hold short line. DO NOT cross subsequent taxiways unless directed by ATC.