Angular Limb Deformities, Flexural Deformities/Tendon Laxity Flashcards Preview

RUSVM Large Animal Surgery > Angular Limb Deformities, Flexural Deformities/Tendon Laxity > Flashcards

Flashcards in Angular Limb Deformities, Flexural Deformities/Tendon Laxity Deck (21):
1

Is this an example of valgus or varus deformity?

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valgus

2

Is this an example of valgus or varus deformity?

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varus

3

Is this an example of valgus or varus deformity?

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valgus

4

Which statement regarding limb conformation in foals with ALD is correct?

  • With valgus deformities, there is usually a certain degree of outward rotation of the feet
  • With varus deformities there is usually a certain degree of outward rotation of the feet
  • With valgus deformities there is usually a certain degree of inward rotation of the feet
  • Rotational deformities are uncommon in foals with ALD

With valgus deformities, there is usually a certain degree of outward rotation of the feet​

5

Which of the following is not part of the multifactorial complex implicated in development of angular limb deformities in foals?

  • Abnormal fetal limb positioning
  • Placentitis
  • Hypoplasia of the proximal sesamoid bones
  • Growth-plate trauma

Hypoplasia of the proximal sesamoid bones​

6

Which statement regarding diagnosis of angular limb deformities in foals is true?

  • Regardless of the degree and location of the defor- mity, all foals should have their limbs radiographed at the initial examination.
  • The limb can usually be manually straightened in foals with asymmetric physeal or epiphyseal growth.
  • The limb can usually be manually straightened in foals with hypoplasia of the carpal bones.
  • Radiography is useful in determining the degree of rotational deformity.

The limb can usually be manually straightened in foals with hypoplasia of the carpal bones.​

7

Which statement regarding the diagnostic workup in foals with tarsal angular limb deformi- ties is correct?

  • A dorsoplantar radiographic view is especially useful in identifying tarsal bone hypoplasia.
  • A lateromedial radiographic view is especially useful in identifying tarsal bone hypoplasia.
  • Clinicians should rely heavily on a dorsoplantar ra- diographic view for exact identification and evaluation of the location and degree of tarsal angular limb deformities.
  • Concurrent rotational deformities are best identified using radiography.

A lateromedial radiographic view is especially useful in identifying tarsal bone hypoplasia

8

Which of the following is the most likely cause of carpal angular deformities in newborn foals?

  • Asymmetric growth at the distal radial growth plate
  • Periarticular laxity
  • Delayed ossification of the epiphysis
  • Asymmetric growth at the distal radial growth plate and the epiphyseal growth cartilage

Periarticular laxity

9

Which statement regarding congenital hypothyroidism is correct?

  • It has been implicated as a cause of uneven physeal growth.
  • It has been implicated as a cause of delayed ossification of the carpal and tarsal cuboidal bones.
  • It has been implicated as a cause of delayed epiphyseal ossification.
  • It is often associated with abnormal fetal limb posi- tioning.

It has been implicated as a cause of delayed ossification of the carpal and tarsal cuboidal bones.​

10

Foals with tarsal bone hypoplasia tend to present with

  • valgus deformity
  • varus deformity
  • valgus deformity and straight-hocked appearance
  • valgus deformity and sickle-hocked appearance

valgus deformity and sickle-hocked appearance​

11

Which statement regarding physical examination of foals with angular limb deformities is true?

  • Angular limb deformities are often associated with some degree of lameness in the affected limb(s)
  • Angular limb deformities are normally associated with heat, pain, and swelling at the site of the deformity
  • In most cases, foals with angular limb deformities are not lame
  • a and b

In most cases, foals with angular limb deformities are not lame​

12

Which statement regarding foals with cuboidal bone hypoplasia is correct?

  • If left untreated, cuboidal bone hypoplasia results in a manually irreducible deformity within 2 weeks
  • If left untreated, cuboidal bone hypoplasia results in a manually irreducible deformity within 2 days
  • Manual reducibility of this condition is not time dependent
  • This condition is never manually reducible

If left untreated, cuboidal bone hypoplasia results in a manually irreducible deformity within 2 weeks​

13

Angular limb deformities most often originate within the carpal, tarsal, __________ joint regions

  • or distal interphalangeal
  • or proximal interphalangeal
  • or metacarpo- or metatarsophalangeal
  • distal interphalangeal, or metacarpo- or metatarsophalangeal

or metacarpo- or metatarsophalangeal ​

14

To avoid development of a contracted foot in a foal, glue-on shoes should not be left on for longer than:

2 weeks

15

To allow rapid growth in young foals, tube casts should be changed at __________ intervals

10-14 day

16

Corrective ostectomy or osteotomy is

  • preferred in treating tarsal bone hypoplasia
  • preferred in treating severe carpal or tarsal bone hypoplasia
  • generally performed before cessation of physeal growth
  • generally performed after cessation of physeal growth

generally performed after cessation of physeal growth​

17

Which statement regarding tFeatment of foals with carpal bone hypoplasia is correct?

  • Foals with carpal bone hypoplasia often require surgical treatment after an initial period of splint bandaging
  • Foals with valgus deformities caused by carpal bone hypoplasia should be treated with confinement and by applying a glue-on shoe with extension to the inside
  • Foals with valgus deformities caused by carpal bone hypoplasia should be treated with confinement and by applying a glue-on shoe with extension to the outside
  • Foals with carpal bone hypoplasia should be treated with splint bandaging or tube casting.

Foals with carpal bone hypoplasia should be treated with splint bandaging or tube casting.​

18

A 6-week-old foal with a significant varus defor- mity caused by asymmetric grvwth at the distal metatar•I growth plate in the left hindlimb is best treated with

  • splint bandaging and confinement
  • confinement
  • corrective trimming and, possibly, shoeing as well as confinement
  • surgery, corrective trimming, and, possibly, shoeing as well as confinement

corrective trimming and, possibly, shoeing as well as confinement​

19

Potential complications of periosteal transection and stripping for treatment of angular limb deformities includes all of the following except:

  • Incisional infection
  • Incomplete correction
  • Overcorrection
  • Bony exostoses
  • Incisional dehiscence

Overcorrection

20

Concerning hemicircimferential transaction/periosteal stripping for treatment of angular lib deformity, which is LEAST accurate?

  • The surgical procedure is performed on the concave aspect of the affected limb
  • Periosteal stripping is considered to be a growth retardation procedure
  • The duration of its effect is approximately 60 days
  • Over correction of an angular limb deformity des not occur with this surgical procedure
  • Surgical implants (screws, cerclage wire, etc) are not used in this surgical procedure

Periosteal stripping is considered to be a growth retardation procedure​

21

Postoperative treatment of foals using HCPTE includes:

  • free pasture exerdse because it tends to increase the rate of correction
  • confinement
  • splint bandaging
  • none of the above

confinement