Wound Management Flashcards Preview

RUSVM Large Animal Surgery > Wound Management > Flashcards

Flashcards in Wound Management Deck (48):
1

Name four inhibitors of granulation tissue formation:

  1. Pressure
  2. Dry dressing
  3. Corticosteroid cream
  4. Caustic agents

2

T/F: Phenylbutazone may be used in equine and bovine species

False

Phenylbutazone​ should not be used in cattle (long residual effect)

3

If a horse has a wound and a previous tetanus vaccination history, what should be given?

tetanus toxoid

4

A skin graft from the same individual is termed __________

autograft

5

What is the correct order of wound management?

Pack --> Clip --> Lavage

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6

What systemic antibiotics are often used in equines for wound management?

penicillin, penicillin/aminoglycoside, TMS

(local antibiotics may inhibit wound healing)

7

T/F: Treatments that arrest wound contraction and epitheliazation promote the formation of proud flesh

True

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8

In general, how much of the small intestine can be safely resected?

~50%

9

A portion of skin consisting of all the epidermis and 75% of the dermis is harvested from the ventral pectoral area with a dermatome and expanded on stage of staggered razor blades before being sutured to a wound on the same horse’s cannon bone. 

This type of skin graft is best described as a:

split-thickness mesh autograft

10

Aside from cosmetic appearance, what is the #1 problem with proud flesh?

delays wound healing

11

What is the rate of truncal wound epithelial migration?

0.2 mm/day

12

T/F: Penrose drains are used for active drainage of a wound

False

Penrose drains are used for passive drainage of a wound

13

Shown below is a ________ graft

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mesh graft

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14

The period in which the wound becomes larger before contraction is known as the __________

lag period

15

Horses that sustain a heel bulb laceration can successfully return to their intended use. Involvement of the ____________ joint is associated with a poor prognosis

distal interphalangeal joint

16

What is the rate of distal limb wound contraction?

0.2 mm/day

17

What is the 'golden period' in which a wound may be closed primarily?

4 to 6 hours

If there is <106 bacteria/gram of tissue= likely to heal without complication​

18

The #1 reason for using skin grafts in equine patients is for treatment of __________

proud flesh

19

What is the rate of distal limb wound epithelial migration?

0.09 mm/day​

20

What is a full thickness graft?

all of the epidermis and dermis

full thickness grafts give the best cosmetic appearance and hair growth

21

What organism is most commonly isolated from traumatic wounds in equines?

Streptococcus

22

__________ and __________ are the only mammals that develop excessive granulation tissue during wound healing

humans and equines

23

A skin graft from another species is termed __________

xenograft

24

Seabiscuit's cousin, Oceanroll, had a contaminated wound that was left open, but closed before the period of fibroplasia began (<4 days). What type of wound healing is this?

Q image thumb

Delayed primary intention healing

25

Name three benefits of NSAIDs:

  1. Block prostaglandin synthesis
  2. Decrease inflammation
  3. Decrease pain

26

What are the two types of free grafts?

  • Island grafts: pinch, punch, seed, or tunnel grafts
  • Sheet grafts: split of full thickness, solid or meshed grafts

27

The graft type that is used in large animals is known as a free graft. What does that mean?

a graft with no blood supply

28

T/F: Flunixin Meglumine (Banamine®) may be used in equine and bovine species

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True

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29

What are the three major components of second intention wound healing?

fibroplasia, contraction, epithelialization

30

What are the main advantages of pinch grafting?

  • Advantages:
    • General anesthesia not required
    • Minimal equipment necessary
    • Graft failure is rare
  • Disadvantages
    • ​Poor cosmetic appearance
    • Scant hair growth

 

31

Debridement begins ____ hours after wounding

~6 hours

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32

What surgical technique is being shown on this horse?

Q image thumb

punch grafting

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33

If a horse has a wound and no previous tetanus vaccination history, what should be given?

tetanus toxoid and tetanus antitoxin

34

What procedure is being performed on this skin?

Q image thumb

meshing

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35

What is a split thickness graft?

all of the epidermis and a portion of the dermis

36

What is the rate of truncal wound contraction?

1 mm/day

37

What component of second intention wound healing is observed here?

Q image thumb

epithelialization

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38

A skin graft from another member of the same species is termed __________

allograft

39

In basic terms, what is primary intention healing?

healing without fibroplasia

40

Where is exuberant granulation tissue most commonly seen?

distal limbs

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41

This substance is commonly found associated with wounds on the distal limbs of horses, preventing or delaying wound healing:

granulation tissue

42

Three three main reasons for skin graft failure:

motion, infection, hemorrha​ge

43

During this type of wound healing the wound is allowed to heal without suture placement:

2nd intention

44

This type of wound healing provides the best functional and cosmetic outcome for the patient:

primary

45

This fracture extends across a growth plate and through the metaphysis:

Salter Harris Type II

46

PDS takes approximately this long to absorb in the body:

180 days

47

A wound in this location often leads to significant SQ emphysema, and in severe cases pneumomediastinum:

axillary region

48

While these types of skin grafts are not very cosmetic, they are functional and easy to perform:

punch and pinch skin grafts