Chapter 14 home work 12 The sun Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 14 home work 12 The sun Deck (49)
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1

According to modern science, approximately how old is the Sun?

10,000 years
400 million years.
25 million years
4 1/2 billion years

4 1/2 billion years

2

The Sun will exhaust its nuclear fuel in about ______.

5 billion years
50 billion years
5 million years
5000 AD

5 billion years

3

What two physical processes balance each other to create the condition known as gravitational equilibrium in stars?


the nuclear force and the electromagnetic force

the nuclear force and the gravitational force
gravitational force and outward pressure
gravitational force and surface tension

gravitational force and outward pressure

4

The source of energy that keeps the Sun shining today is _________.

chemical reactions
nuclear fusion
nuclear fission
gravitational contraction

nuclear fusion

5

What is the Sun made of (by mass)?

50% hydrogen, 25% helium, 25% other elements
100% hydrogen and helium
70% hydrogen, 28% helium, 2% other elements
90% dark matter, 10% ordinary matter

70% hydrogen, 28% helium, 2% other elements

6

From center outward, which of the following lists the "layers" of the Sun in the correct order?

Core, radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, corona
Core, radiation zone, convection zone, corona, chromosphere, photosphere
Core, convection zone, radiation zone, corona, chromosphere, photosphere
Core, corona, radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere

Core, radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, corona

7

The Sun's surface, as we see it with our eyes, is called the _________.

chromosphere
core
corona
photosphere

photosphere

8

The Sun's average surface temperature of the sun at its photosphere is about ______.

37,000 K
5,800 K
1,000 K
1,000,000 K

5,800 K

9

The fundamental nuclear reaction occurring in the core of the Sun is _________.

nuclear fission
nuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium
nuclear fusion of helium to carbon
radioactive decay

nuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium

10

The light radiated from the Sun's surface reaches Earth in about 8 minutes, but the energy of that light was released by fusion in the solar core about _________.

three days ago
one hundred years ago
a few hundred thousand years ago
one thousand years ago

a few hundred thousand years ago

11

What happens to energy in the Sun's convection zone?

Energy slowly leaks outward through the radiative diffusion of photons that repeatedly bounce off ions and electrons.
Energy is produced in the convection zone by nuclear fusion.
Energy is produced in the convection zone by thermal radiation.
Energy is transported outward by the rising of hot plasma and sinking of cooler plasma.

Energy is transported outward by the rising of hot plasma and sinking of cooler plasma.

12

What do sunspots, solar prominences, and solar flares all have in common?

They all have about the same temperature.
They all occur only in the Sun's photosphere.
They are all strongly influenced by magnetic fields on the Sun.
They are all shaped by the solar wind.

They are all strongly influenced by magnetic fields on the Sun.

13

Which of the following is not a characteristic of the 11-year sunspot cycle?

The Sun's entire magnetic field flip-flops with each cycle, so that the overall magnetic cycle averages 22 years.
The sunspot cycle is very steady, so that each 11-year cycle is nearly identical to every other 11-year cycle.
The likelihood of seeing solar prominences or solar flares is higher when sunspots are more common and lower when they are less common.
The number of sunspots on the Sun at any one time gradually rises and falls, with an average of 11 years between the times when sunspots are most numerous.

The sunspot cycle is very steady, so that each 11-year cycle is nearly identical to every other 11-year cycle.

14

How is the sunspot cycle directly relevant to us here on Earth?

The sunspot cycle is the cause of global warming.
The Sun's magnetic field, which plays a major role in the sunspot cycle, affects compass needles that we use on Earth.
Coronal mass ejections and other activity associated with the sunspot cycle can disrupt radio communications and knock out sensitive electronic equipment.
The brightening and darkening of the Sun that occurs during the sunspot cycle affects plant photosynthesis here on Earth.
The sunspot cycle strongly influences Earth's weather.

Coronal mass ejections and other activity associated with the sunspot cycle can disrupt radio communications and knock out sensitive electronic equipment.

15

Listed following are the different layers of the Sun. Rank these layers based on their distance from the Sun’s center, from greatest to least.
Corna
chromosphere'
photosphere
convection zone
radiation zone
core

Corna
chromosphere'
photosphere
convection zone
radiation zone
core

16

Rank the layers of the Sun based on their density, from highest to lowest.

core
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere
chromosphere
cornoa

core
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere
chromosphere
cornoa

17

Rank the following layers of the Sun based on their temperature, from highest to lowest.

core
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere

core
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere

18

Rank the following layers of the Sun based on the pressure within them, from highest to lowest.

core
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere

core
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere

19

In which of the following layer(s) of the Sun does nuclear fusion occur?
Select all that apply.

corona
radiation zone
convection zone
photosphere
core
chromosphere

core

20

Which of the following layers of the Sun can be seen with some type of telescope? Consider all forms of light, but do not consider neutrinos or other particles.
Select all that apply.

radiation zone
convection zone
chromosphere
core
corona
photosphere

chromosphere
corona
photosphere

21

Following are the different layers of the Sun’s atmosphere. Rank them based on the order in which a probe would encounter them when traveling from Earth to the Sun’s surface, from first encountered to last.

corona
chromosphere
photosphere

corona
chromosphere
photosphere

22

Rank the layers of the Sun’s atmosphere based on their density, from highest to lowest.

photosphere
chromosphere
cornoa

photosphere
chromosphere
cornoa

23

Rank the layers of the Sun’s atmosphere based on their temperature, from highest to lowest.

corona
chromosphere
photosphere

corona
chromosphere
photosphere

24

Rank the layers of the atmosphere based on the energy of the photons that are typically emitted there, from highest to lowest.

corona
chromosphere
photosphere

corona
chromosphere
photosphere

25

nuclear fusion of hydrogen in helium occurs in the

core

26

Energy moves through the sun's _____ by means of the rising of hot gas and falling of cooler gas.

Convection zone

27

Nearly all the visible light we see from the Sun is emitted from the

Photosphere

28

Most of the Sun's ultraviolet light is emitted from the narrow layer called the ______ where temperature increases with altitude.

Chromosphere

29

We can see the Sun's _____ most easily during total solar eclipses.

Corona

30

The ______ is the layer of the Sun between its core and convection zone.

radiation zone