CONCEPT 47: REVERSE CREAM FOR DELICATE CAKES Flashcards Preview

THE SCIENCE OF GOOD COOKING > CONCEPT 47: REVERSE CREAM FOR DELICATE CAKES > Flashcards

Flashcards in CONCEPT 47: REVERSE CREAM FOR DELICATE CAKES Deck (49):
1

While creaming butter and sugar is the first step in most cake recipes, is it the only option?

No, another technique has become popular: reverse creaming.

2

Why is reverse creaming Test Kitchen's choice when making classic yellow layer cake and many other kinds of holiday cookies?

Because it minimizes rise and yields cakes and cookies with flat tops that are perfect for decorating.

3

Why is reverse creaming ok for layer cakes but not Bundt and pound cakes?

Layer cakes always contain at least one leavener so proper rise isn't an issue. But most of the time you don't want cake layer to rise all that much since they contain, well, layers sandwiched by thick coats of frosting.

4

What happens when you use creaming method with a layer cake?

It can produce a cake that's too tall with a crumb that's too coarse and open to support the layers of a finished cake.

5

Reverse creaming is also called what?

The "two-stage method."

6

Who invented the "two-stage method?"

General Mills and Pillsbury in the 1940s and later popularized by Rose Levy Beranbaum in her seminal book The Cake Bible, publish in 1988. The advent of chlorinated cake flour and modern shortening made this possible.

7

Can soft, low-protein flour absorb as much liquid as high-protein flour?

No, but low-protein flour that has been bleached with chlorine can hold more liquid.

8

What is essential for the success of a "two-stage method?" Explain.

A bleached cake flour because it can hold more water, which is necessary when the weight of the sugar exceeds the weight of the flour.

9

Why is the "two-stage method" also known has the "high-ratio method?"

The high ratio of liquid to flour.

10

The "high-ratio method" produces what final result?

A more velvety, tender crumb compared with other methods of mixing.

11

Describe the steps of a two-stage method?

Flour, sugar, baking powder and salt (dry ingredients) are combined in the mixing bowl and then softened butter is beaten into the dry ingredient, one piece at a time, before the milk and eggs are added in two batches (hence "two-stage" part of the name).

12

What is the key element of revers creaming?

The fat in the softened butter (which should be around 68 degrees) coats the flour and therefore minimizes the development of gluten that begins when the liquid is added. But just as important, the softened butter contains fewer fat crystals so less air is retained within the batter.

13

Test Kitchen's feeling on the "two-stage method."

Adding the eggs and milk in two batches isn't always necessary; they like the term "reverse creaming" for that reason.

14

Because the two stage method doesn't highly aerate the butter, the cake layers end up not quite as tall. Perfect for what?

Layers of frosting!

15

How does the two stage method reduce the risk of tough cake?

Because the development of gluten is minimized from the onset, the cakes end up with a crumb that is more delicate and fine, almost velvety smooth and tender.

16

Why is it easier to create gluten when creaming method is used?

Flour and milk are added alternately in small batches at the end. The tendency there is to over beat the batter in order to get it fully incorporated.

17

Don't restrict reverse creaming simply to layer cakes. What else can this method be used on?

Crumb cakes, which need the support of butter crumbs; cupcakes, which can stand up to a thick filling of pastry cream; and sugar cookies that are glazed.

18

TEST KITCHEN: LAYERS CAKES MADE WITH CREAMING AND REVERSE CREAMING.

They created two very different products. The cakes that were creamed were springy with an open, coarse crumb, while-reverse creaming baked up extremely tender with a fine crumb and soft, cottony interior.

19

Go to method when tenderness is priority.

Reverse creaming.

20

How long can cakes be stored at room temperature?

Tightly wrapped in plastic for a day.

21

How do you freeze cakes?

Tightly wrapped in plastic, then foil; frozen up to one month.

22

Problem with most cakes that use classic creaming method.

Instead of melting in your mouth, these cakes were crumbly, sugary, and a little hard. And they didn't taste of butter and eggs, as all plain cakes ought to.

23

Best method to make a yellow cake? Why?

Reverse creaming gave a tender texture, fine crumb and rich, buttery, eggy flavor.

24

For a delicate cake, you must start with what?

Cake flour

25

Does fat help make a cake more tender?

Yes

26

How do you ensure an easy cake removal?

Grease the pans, line them with payment, then grease and flour the parchment.

27

Whats wrong with a frosting made with only butter and confectioners sugar?

It's somewhat gritty and very sweet.

28

How do you make a classic butter cream?

The eggs, sugar and vanilla are heated to 160ºF and then whipped until airy before the softening butter is beaten into the mixture. Results in a satiny texture.

29

Why are the eggs, sugar and vanilla heated to 160ºF in a classic butter cream?

To make the eggs safe and unlock their thickening properties.

30

What's the best way to ensure even cooking in your cakes?

Bake them on the same rack, side by side.

31

What happens when cakes are stacked in bottom-heating ovens?

The bottom one acts as a barrier, creating hot air currents that flow up and over the top cake. The result is an overcooked bottom cake.

32

Are results uneven in rear-heating ovens or those with top and bottom elements?

Yes, but when cakes are baked side by side, hot air circulates evenly no matter how your oven heats.

33

What is the reason baking will yield different results?

Convection currents

34

The original crumb cake was brought to New York by who?

German immigrants; sadly, the bakery-fresh version have all but disappeared.

35

Most modern crumb cake recipes use what?

They use butter cake rather than the traditional yeast dough.

36

Do you need more butter for a crumb topping than a streusel?

Yes, it will look like a dough when finished.

37

Why does reverse creaming work better than classic creaming for cupcakes?

Traditional creaming creates large air pockets that result in a coarser crumb. Reverse creaming method coats flour with butter before the batter is aerated, keeping the cake tender and fine-crumbed.

38

Why would you use AP flour for cupcakes?

Because they need to be a bit sturdier than delicate, tender cake layers.

39

Best way to fill cupcakes.

Remove a cone shaped section of the cake from the top; glaze will make it invisible.

40

How do you create superfine sugar?

Process granulated sugar in the food processor for 30 seconds.

41

Why use superfine sugar for cookies?

Granulated sugar makes cookies with a flaky texture and some large holes. In contrast, superfine sugar yields crisp, compact cookies with a fine, even crumb that is preferable for a cookie that will be glazed.

42

What does an egg do for cookies?

Makes them moist and chewy.

43

Why was cream cheese a good substitute in cookies?

More butter can make a dough sticky and hard to handle. However, cream cheese is softer than butter when chilled making dough easier to roll out. It also adds a nice tang.

44

Why AP flour for holiday glazed cookies?

It develops enough gluten for cookies to be glazed and decorated without too much worry they will crumble.

45

How do you keep dough from making a mess?

Roll between two pieces of parchment paper.

46

Is dough easier to cut when cold?

Yes, it also cut more cleanly.

47

Is there a difference between a hand-held and stand mixer?

The stand mixer offers greater versatility and allows the cooks to accomplish other tasks while mixing. However, the hand-held mixer generally yields baked goods that are identical to those prepared in a stand mixer.

48

How long will vanilla extract last in a sealed container?

Indefinitely if stored away from heat and light.

49

Why is vanilla extract so stable compared to beans or paste?

It has a minimum alcohol content of 35%.

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