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Flashcards in Functional medicine model Deck (39)
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1

What is Naturopathic Nutritional Therapy?

It is scientific (evidence based) and non scientific (anecdotal) based on own evidence from clinical practice.

2

What is functional Medicine?

A dynamic process in which you can apply to chronic disease cases to help to assess, prevent and advise on aspects on the client's health.

3

How can we ensure that the principle of 'treating the whole person' can be followed?

Asking ourselves what is the health of this person today in relation to their:
physiological
emotional/mental
spiritual
environmental
societal (divorce, relationship breakups, death)

4

What are the principles of FM?

1. We are all biochemically individual based on the concepts of our genetic and environmental uniqueness.
2. We use a patient centred approach, not a disease centred approach.
3. To help clients find dynamic balance between all aspects of their health (mind, body, spirit) - homeostasis.
4.Factors that influence our health is a complex web of interconnections, not a straightforward cause and effect approach.
5. Health should be viewed as the presence of positive vitality, not just the absence of disease.
6. Promotion of organ reserve as a way of prevention.

5

What are the physiological processes that determine health or disease?

1. communication (in and out of cell).
2. Bioenergetics (transformation of food into energy- prep of food, digestion of food).
3.Replication(repair and maintenance of structural integrity - cellular and whole body)
4. Elimination of wastes (transit time)
5. Protection and defence (immune system)
6. Transport and circulation (cardiovascular, lymphatic system)

6

What is the 4P approach?

1. Personalised (genetic and environmental)
2. Predictive (biomarkers e.g inflammation)
3. Preventive (proactive v reactive)
4. Participatory (empowers and engages clients)

7

Describe the functional medicine tree.

Roots - environmental inputs
Trunk - Antecedents, triggers and mediators
Top of tree - Disease process

8

During a consultation you find out out that there is a structural imbalance who might you refer them to?

osteopath or chiropractor.

9

What mild-severe symptoms might a client experience with adverse food reactions?

Mild -Indigestion, gastritis, eczema
Severe - coeliac disease, arthritis, chronic infections.
NS - depression, anxiety, chronic fatigue

10

Name 5 reactive chemical agents released by the immune system following an adverse food reaction.

Histamines
Cytokines
Prostaglandins
Lymphokines
Interferons

11

What are some of the symptoms associated with a true food allergy causing atopic IgE mediated hypersensitivity?

airway closure
throat and tongue oedema
urticaria (hives)
leading to anaphylaxis (shock)

12

What are some of the possible causes for increase in food allergies and intolerances?

Lack of digestive enzymes or hydrochloric acid in the stomach, coupled with increased intestinal permeability. This may cause larger proteins to break past mucosal barriers where they can interact with the immune system.

13

Common symptoms of food allergy?

sneezing, runny nose, itchy eyes and ears, severe wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, sinus problems, a sore palate and urticaria.

14

Common conditions associated with food allergy?

asthma, eczema, headaches, lethargy, loss of concentration, digestive disturbances and coeliac disease.

15

List 5 negative effects of smoking on the body.

Cancers of the lips, mouth, throat and larnyx, lung, kidney and bladder.
Poor circulation
Strokes
Infertility
Type 2 diabetes

16

Name 4 routes of exposure to pesticides, insecticides and chemical.

Food
Air
Water
Consumer products

17

Name 5 common offenders of toxic chemical exposures

Arsenic
Asbestos
Fluoride
Lead
Mercury

18

What are the best known effects of lead toxicity in the central nervous system?

Lowers IQ
Impairs memory
reduces the ability to concentrate

19

What does mercury bind to inside cells and what does it cause?

Glutathione, reducing it's production which may result to a rise in oxidative stress and liver detoxification impairment.

20

What are amphetamines? Give some examples.

Belong to a group of drugs called 'psycho stimulants' - they stimulate the central nervous system and speed up messages going to and from the brain to the body. E.g speed, meth, cystal, ecstacy

21

What are the long term effects to regular amphetamine users?

Psychosis
Violence
Brain damage
reduced resistance to infections

22

What are the long term effects of cannabis?

respiratory illness
hormones
may impair immune system
reduced motivation
reduced brain function
mental disorders

23

High doses of cocaine can lead to?

tremors and muscle twitches
nausea and vomiting
rapid and weak pulse
arrhythmia
chest pain
heart attack
seizures and stroke

24

What are the common 'ACHE' side effects of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP)

Abdominal Pain
Chest Pain
Headaches (severe)
Eye Problems (blurred vision)
Swelling and/aching in legs and thighs

25

What are the milder symptoms of taking OCP?

nausea
weight gain
sore or swollen breasts
spotting between periods
lighter periods
mood changes

26

The 'ACHES' symptoms may indicate a serious disorder, name some of these?

Liver disease
Gallbladder disease
Thromboembolism (blood clots)
High blood pressure
Heart disease

27

What are antibiotics?

Drugs derived wholly or partially from bacteria or moulds.

28

What are the common side effects of antibiotics?

upset stomach
diarrhoea
vaginal yeast infections

29

What are the more severe side effects of antibiotics?

May impair the function of:
the kidneys
the liver
bone marrow
other organs
some develop colitis (inflammation of large intestine).

30

What are the functions of prostaglandins?

1.Promote inflammation, pain and fever
2.support the blood clotting function of platelets
3.protects the lining of the stomach from acids