Glaucoma Vol. 3 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Glaucoma Vol. 3 Deck (28):
1

What is the average lOP of the standard population?

15.5 mmHg (2.6 mmHg standard deviation)

2

How is corneal curvature related to lOP measurement?

Increased corneal steepness is related to higher lOP readings

3

What retinal vascular condition is associated with increased lOP and glaucoma?

Central retinal vain occlusion (CRVO)

4

What age is most commonly associated with pseudoexfoliation syndrome?

Age > 70

5

What is an important caveat in the treatment of lOP in patient with history of CRVO?

lOP in fellow eye must be kept as low as possible as well

6

What configuration of the iris is associated with pigment dispersion syndrome?

Posterior bowing of the iris (causing "reverse pupillary block)

7

How do visual field defects in normal-tension glaucoma tend to differ from those in POAG?

Visual field defects tend to be more focal, deeper, and closer to fixation

8

What condition is associated with wide fluctuation in lOP, especially after exercise or pupillary dilation?

Pigment dispersion syndrome

9

What condition is associated with elderly patient with history of mature cataracts who presents with pain, conjunctival hyperemia, and worsening vision.

Phacolytic glaucoma

10

What causes a Krukenberg spindle?

Aqueous convection currents and subsequent phagocytosis of pigment by corneal endothelium

11

What condition can Posner-Schlossman syndrome often be confused with?

Angle-closure glaucoma

12

Name 3 characteristics of the most common type of patient with pigment dispersion syndrome.

1. White male 2. Myopia 3. Age 20 to 50

13

What condition is associated with increased risk of complications of hyphema due to increased lOP?

Sickle cell anemia

14

How is posterior bowing of the iris thought to cause increased lOP?

By increased contact of zonular fibers with the posterior iris surface, causing increased pigment release

15

What condition is associated with patient with increased IOP and small, khaki colored cells in the anterior chamber following a vitreous hemorrhage?

Ghost cell glaucoma

16

How long does it typically take for ghost cells to develop following vitreous hemorrhage?

1 to 3 months

17

What causes phacoantigenic glaucoma?

Sensitization of patient's own lens protein following surgery or trauma, resulting in granulomatous inflammation

18

What is the most common cause of uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema (UGH) syndrome?

Malposition or rotated anterior chamber IOL (can also be caused by posterior IOL)

19

What condition is associated with chronic inflammation, iris neovascularization, and recurrent hyphema?

UGH syndrome

20

What is the most common cause of glaucoma in primary metastatic tumors or the ciliary body?

Direct invasion of the anterior chamber angle

21

What is glaucomatocyclitic crisis? (Posner-Schlossmann syndrome)

Recurrent bouts of markedly elevated lOP and low-grade inflammation

22

What is the typical gonioscopic finding or Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis?

Multiple fine vessels that cross the trabecular meshwork

23

What type of cells block the trabecular meshwork in hemolytic glaucoma?

Hemoglobin-laden macrophages

24

What type of cells block the trabecular meshwork in ghost cell glaucoma?

Degenerated RBCs

25

What causes angle recession?

Tear in the ciliary body (usually between the longitudinal and circular muscle fibers)

26

What type of glaucoma is associated with history of previous trauma?

Angle-recession glaucoma

27

What is Schwartz-Matsuo syndrome?

Elevated lOP following rhematogenous retinal detachment

28

What causes elevated lOP in Schwartz-Matzo syndrome?

Photoreceptor outer segments that reach the anterior chamber and block the trabecular meshwork