Nerves 1-3 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Nerves 1-3 Deck (33):
1

What are the dendrites on a nerve cell?

Where the nerve cell receives information

2

What is the name given to the body of a nerve cell?

Soma

3

What are the 4 different types of glial cell?

Astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia and appendimal cells

4

What is the function of astrocytes?

Maintains chemical concentrations and gradients Removes waste Repair Important contribution in the BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER

5

What are the glial cells in the PNS?

Satellite cells and schwann cells

6

What do satellite cells surround?

They surround the sensory and autonomic ganglia

7

What is the function of satellite cells?

They regulate the microenvironment of the ganglia in the peripheral nervous system

8

Which glial cells are responsible for providing the myelin sheath around the axons?

Oligodendrocytes and schwann cells

9

What is the function of microglial cells?

Immune role, Ingest cells and pathogens

10

What is the function of appendimal glial cells?

Filters blood to make CSF

11

What portion of the nervous system is responsible for gut activity?

The enteric system

12

The cortex contains grooves, what is the name given to a groove that surrounds a gyrus?

A sulcus

13

What is the cortex?

The outer layer of the cerebrum consisting of folded grey matter

14

What is the cerebellum responsible for?

Coordinates and regulates muscular activity

15

What is the function of the cerebrum?

It is associated with higher brain power such as thought and action

16

What is the name given to the 4 lobes of the cerebrum?

Occipital, frontal, temporal and parietal

17

What does the brain stem contain?

Midbrain, pons and the medulla oblongata

18

What does the diencephalon contain?

It is the posterior part of the brain and it contains the epithalamus, thalamus and the hypothalamus

19

Which part of a nerve cell triggers the action potential?

Axon hillock

20

Where can you find interneurones?

 

In the CNS

21

What is deplarization?

When the cell membrane potential becomes more positively charged

22

Why is a cell normally electronegative?

Because of a higher portion of positive ions outside the cell

23

What causes the cell to hyperpolarise?

 

The movement of potassium ions out of the cell via potassium channels

24

Give examples of graded potentials

 

Generator potentials, post synaptic potentials, end plate potentials end plate potentials

25

Why are graded potentials described as decremental?

Current leaks out the membrane as you travel away from the source

26

How can you create an IPSP?

Opening chloride ion channels (fast)

Opening more chlorine channels (slow - acts via G protein)

27

How can you create an EPSP?

Opening more sodium channels or closing potassium channels

28

Why is the sodium channel described as a mono-valent non-specific cation channel?

Some potassium can travel as well

29

What is the summation of EPSP's?

EPSP can accumulate from many inputs

30

What is temporal summation?

When you get two EPSP's from the same synapse in close succession

31

What is spatial summation?

When there is an accumulation of EPSP's from different synapses

32

Which synapses will suffer less decay?

Those closer to the axon hillock

33