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Flashcards in Overview of Self-Regulation Deck (24)
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1

Self-Regulation

Any effort by a human being to alter its own behavioral responses

2

Pathology

illness or disease
Impairment in social or occupational function
not always biological

3

Hedonia

pleasure
motivation to seek things that feel good
pleasure seeking and pain avoiding

4

Anhedonia

lack of pleasure
inability to feel reward or pleasure
lead to more radical behavior to get pleasure

5

Euthymia

normal mood

6

Dysphoria

bad mood

7

Euphoria

good mood

8

Homeostasis

▪ Body returns parameters within “normal” range
▪ Set point is fixed or constant

9

Allostasis

▪ Keeping body parameters stable
▪ Set point is outside “normal” range
▪ Heavily shaped by our environments
The concept of physiology where an organism must
vary all of the parameters of its internal milieu and
match them appropriately to perceived and
anticipated environmental demands in order to
maintain stability
▪ Maintenance of apparent stability at a new,
potentially pathological “set point”
▪ Small challenge can lead to breakdown

10

Nondependent unconditioned stimulus (think of the graph)

High imediate A states then it levels out
I small short B state

11

Dependent unconditioned stimulus (think of the graphs)

B states last longer and is stronger than A
Takes longer or more to reach an A state and leads to addiction to compete with increasing B state

12

A states

elevation or peak of a stimulus
on effect of an unnfected stimulus
elevation in "mood"
ex. first bite of cake is good, tenth is still good, 50th you dont want anymore

13

B states

go below normal state
most times you can quickly recover

14

Homeostasis vs. Allostasis

homeostasis- physiologic equilibrium, normal set point
stable, wide dynamic
range, no pathology
allostasis- compensated
equilibrium, abnormal set point
inherently unstable, restricted range, leads to pathology

15

Importance of Self-Regulation

1. Self-regulation failure linked to many social ills
2. Raising of self-esteem is not the answer
3. Children who choose delayed gratification are
more successful adolescents

16

Self-regulation failure linked to many social
problems of contemporary society

1. Failure to control money
2. Failure to control weight
3. Failure to control emotions
4. Failure to control drinking and drugs
5. Failure to control sexual impulses

Raising self-esteem is not the answer

17

Value of self-regulation

1. Lessen high divorce rate
2. Lessen crime rate
3. Children who can delay gratification are more
successful as adolescents

18

Essential features of self-regulation

A. Hierarchy of multiple processes: Overriding where one process overrides another (low level vs high level and usually choose low)
B. Feedback loops

19

Overriding or Self-stopping

what we think we should do and what we see others doing
a. Essential nature of self-regulation
b. Higher processes override lower processes
c. There are multiple levels of action
d. Self-stopping is the most basic form of
overriding

20

What are higher processes?

a. Longer time spans (gettign an A vs getting a 3.8 GPA)
b. More extensive networks of meaningful
associations
c. More distal, abstract goals (getting good grades to be successful not to apease parents)

ex. lower process is a desire for a cigarette and higher process is the resolution to quit

21

Children's ability to delay gratification

pre-test to find prefered toys to motivate delay
create a conflict in the shild to wait with one object and if they wait they get 2
child had to wait 15 minutes

22

Feedback Loops

1. Standards-target (want to quit smoking)
2. Monitoring-attention (can tell where you are and know where you want to be)
3. Strength - operating (excute effective change)

23

TOTE

Standards-desired goal
Test-monitoring-ability to accurately detect
Operate/Exit-strength-ability to effectively change

24

Two types of control

1. Primary control: Changing environment to fit
self
2. Secondary control: Changing self to fit
environment