pharmacology: antipsychotics Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in pharmacology: antipsychotics Deck (14):
1

what is involved in the etiology of schizophrenia?

too much dopamine and serotonin

2

positive symptoms of schizophrenia? negative symptoms?

positive symptoms: though disorders, delusions, hallucination, paranoia
negative symptoms: amotivation, social withdrawal, flat affect, poverty of speech

3

mechanism of antipsychotics

blockade of dopamine and/or 5HT2 receptors

4

uses of antipsychotics

schizophrenia, schizoaffective states, bipolar disorder, tourettes, huntingtons, drug or radiation emesis

5

side effects from dopamine bloackade

dyskinesias (EPS), dysphoria, endocrine dysfunction (temp regulation problems on central level; increased prolactin, increased eating disorders)

6

management of acute EPS vs management of chronic EPS

acute: antimuscarinic drugs (benztropine or diphenhydramien)
chronic: discontinuation/switch to atypical

7

what are the typical antipsychotics?

chlorpromazine, thioridazine, fluphenazine, haloperidol

8

characteristics of the antipsychotic typicals (chlorpromazine, thioridazine, fluphenazine, haloperidol)

muscarinic block, alpha block, sedation, EPS

9

side effects of thioridazine

cardiotoxicity and convulsions, retinal deposits

10

haloperidol side effects

most likely cause of neuroleptic malignant syndrome and tardive dyskinesias (because more potent)

11

what are the antipsychotic atypicals

clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, aripiprazole

12

side effects of clozapine

agranulocytosis (destruction of WBC), increased salivation, seizures

13

why is there less EPS with the atypicals

blocks serotonin receptors, improving negative symptoms

14

aripiprazole mechanism

partial agonist of D2 receptor and also blocks serotonin receptor