Week 1.3 Chief Complaint by Symptoms Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Week 1.3 Chief Complaint by Symptoms Deck (27)
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1

what are some locations of symptoms for joint pain

lumbar region
first MTP
medial aspect of the knee
upper limb

2

what are some natures of complaints

gout, OA, RA, ankylosing spondy, systemic lupus, reactive arthritis, septic arthritis

3

why is it important to know how many joints are involved

to know what kind of condition we are dealing with (OA/RA vs, gout)

4

what are some conditions associated with monoarticular pain

OA, gout, psoriatic arthritis, septic arthritis

5

what are some conditions associated with poliarticular

RA, juvénile RA, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosis spondy, reactive arthritis

6

what 3 joints are not usually involved in OA

TMJ, elbow, wrist.

7

what levels of the C-spine are typically affected by OA

usually C5-6, C6-7

8

what levels of the C-spine are typically associated with RA

the whole C-spine, with upper cervical spine instability.

9

what are some systemic complaints associated with RA

dry eye and mouth, reactive lymphadenopathy, intermittent hoarseness, pleural effusion and fibrosis, pericardial effusions, enlarged spleen, amyloidosis, mononeuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytosis, necrotizing vasculitis, cutaneous vasculitis,

10

what are some conditions associated with non-joint limb pain

hypothyroidism
lyme
polymyalgia rheumatica
satin related myopathies
vascular and neurogenic claudication
tibial stress reaction injury
DVT
compartment syndrome.

11

what are some symptoms associated with hypothyroidism

myalgia, pain, stiffness, slow and steady weight gain,

12

what is polymyalgia rheumatica

pain and stiffness in the shoulder girdle, pelvic and thigh region, and bilateral and symmetrical. The arm, hand and wrist may also be involved. you have morning stiffness for an hour or longer, and you have difficulty with bed mobility, transitions, and ambulation.

13

how many people over the age of 60 have dizziness

20-30 percent

14

what are some causes of dizziness

vestibular, cardiovascular, craniovertebral junction disorders, neurologic, psychiatric

15

what are some associated complaints with dizziness

hearing loss, tinnitus, aural pressure, CNS or cerebellar signs.

16

what are emergency situations with dizziness

inter cranial bleeds, and cardiac arrhythmia.

17

disequilibrium clinical manifestations are characterized by impaired

walking, hearing, vision.

18

what is the history of cardinals signs

bilateral or quadrilateral limb paresthesias
perioral lip numbness,
nystagmus
drop attacks

19

what are some fracture tests

-Canadian c-spine rules
-gross loss of active or passive ROM
-observation of mastic or facial ecchymosis
-light cranial compression is painful
-abnormal end feel ligamentous
-painful and weak on restricted isometric contraction
-tuning fork (pain with vibration)

20

what are the CN tests

1. olfactory
2. optic
3, 4, 6. oculomotor, trochlear, abducens
5. trigeminal
7. facial
8. vestibulocochlear
9, 10. glossopharyngeal, vagus
11. accessory
12. hypoglossal

21

what tests do you use for sensation

light touch, pain, temperature

22

what tests do you use for mechanoreception

conscious proprioception, vibration, stereognosis

23

what tests do you use for motor

strength, spasticity, DTR, clonus

24

what tests do you use for nocioceptive reflex

babinski, Oppenheimer, Hoffman

25

what things in the history can point to dizziness

medications, exercise, sleep hygiene, smoking, alcohol

26

what are the 4 categories of dizziness

vertigo (peripheral vs central)
disequilibrium (imbalance)
pre syncope (fainting, CV vs non-CV)
nonspecific (panic and anxiety)

27

what are some cervicogenic dizziness associated conditions

WAD, AAI, degenerative changes in the C-spine