Viral Foodborne Diseases Flashcards Preview

RUSVM Epidemiology 2016 > Viral Foodborne Diseases > Flashcards

Flashcards in Viral Foodborne Diseases Deck (37):
1

What are the most common causes of foodborne illness?

Viruses

2

Where does Hepatitis A replicate?

Liver

3

Does infection with Hepatitis A show symptoms in infants and children?

NO

4

What is the reservoir for Hepatitis A?

Humans
Non-human primates

5

How long is Hepatitis A shed for before illness ?

1-3 weeks

6

What are the two types of Endemicity?

High
Low

7

High Endemicity

Poor socioeconomic conditions allow HAV to spread from person to person. Entire population is infected as children. There is minimal clinical disease

8

Low Endemicity

Better sanitation reduces transmission. Seroprevalence is lower. The average age of infection goes up and there is more clinical disease. Outbreaks more often because more adults are susceptible

9

What is the transmission of Hepatitis A?

Fecal-Oral
Food and water contaminated with feces

10

What is the incubation period for Hepatitis A?

28 days

11

What is the duration of illness for Hepatitis A?

2 weeks - 3 months

12

What are the clinical signs associated with Hepatitis A?

Diarrhea
Dark Urine
Jaundice
Flu-like symptoms
Nausea
Anorexia
Fever
Malaise
abdominal pain

13

What is the treatment for Hepatitis A?

Supportive Care

14

How you prevent Hepatitis A?

Vaccination
Proper sewage and water treatment
Proper preparation, cooking, and handling of food, wash veggies, and fruit
Block transmission with personal hygiene

15

What is the most common cause of foodborne illness world wide?

Norovirus

16

What is the reservoir for Norovirus?

People

17

How is Norovirus transmitted?

Fecal-oral
Contaminated Food or Water
Contaminated surfaces

18

When does norovirus start shedding post infection?

18 hours

19

How long does Norovirus shed for?

13-56 days

20

What is the incubation period for Norovirus?

12-48 hours

21

What is the duration of illness for Norovirus?

24-72 hours

22

What are the clinical signs of Norovirus?

Nausea
Acute onset vomiting
Watery non-bloody diarrhea with abdominal cramps
"Two Bucket Disease"

23

What is the treatment for Norovirus?

Supportive Care

24

How do you prevent Norovirus?

Good Sanitation
Proper preparation, cooking and handling of foods
Proper sewage and water treatment
Block transmission through hygiene

25

Where is Norovirus commonly found?

on Cruise ships

26

What is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children around the world?

Rotavirus

27

What is the reservoir for Rotavirus?

People

28

How is Rotavirus transmitted?

Fecal-oral
Contaminated Food and Water
Fomites contaminated with feces

29

How long is Rotavirus shed?

2-10 days after onset of diarhhea

30

Who is most at risk for Rotavirus?

Children in daycares and hospitals
Parents or workers in day cares and hosptials
Immunodeficient people

31

What is the incubation period for Rotavirus?

less than 48 hours

32

What is the duration of illness for Rotavirus?

3-7 days

33

What are the clinical signs of Rotavirus?

Diarrhea
temporary lactose intolerance
dehydration
electrolyte imbalance

34

What is the treatment for Rotavirus?

Supportive Care

35

How do you prevent Rotavirus?

Vaccination
Proper sanitation
Proper preparation, cooking, and handling of food
Personal hygiene

36

What is the difference between Viral and bacterial foodborne illness?

Bacterial illnesses have a moderate incubation, lack of vomiting and longer duration of illness

37

What is the difference between viral and parasitic foodborne illnesses?

Parasitic illnesses have a longer incubation period and a longer duration of illness