2-5 - Word Learning Strategies Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 2-5 - Word Learning Strategies Deck (13):
1

What is the problem for children when learning words?

Spoken words can have numerous possible meanings depending on the situation?

2

How do children solve the problem of words having multiple meanings?

By employing a range of strategies to determine word meanings

3

What are four Cognitive Strategies to word learning?

The Whole Word Assumption

The Type Assumption

The Basic Level Assumption

Mutual Exclusivity

4

What is the Whole Word Assumption?

Words refer to whole objects,

(e.g. the collie is the whole animal, not just its nose, head, collar, etc.)

5

What is the Type Assumption?

Words refer to a category, not an individual

(e.g. : the collie is a type of dog, not the name of this collie)

6

What is the Basic Level Assumption?

Words refer to objects that are alike in basic ways

(e.g. ‘collie’ is not a word for animals, but for the class of animals that look like this one )

7

What is Mutual Exclusivity?

Words differ in meaning,

(e.g. ‘collie’ does not mean ‘dog’, ‘nose’ etc.)

(i.e. words the child knows)

8

What are Linguistic Strategies to word learning?

Using language structures provide insight to meanings.

9

What are Articles?

A, An, The

Indicate members of a class

10

What can articles or the lack or articles tell us about a word?

Something is a noun

Lack of articles = names and/or classes

(e.g. “this is a dog” vs. “this is Ben” vs. “these are dogs”)

11

Research with children as young as _____ show evidence that children are sensitive to the
role of ______.

1;6

Articles

12

Linguistic strategies may be especially important for the acquisition of ____________________.

(4)

Verbs

Adjectives

Prepositions

Etc.

13

What is Syntactic Bootstrapping?

The idea that when verbs are in context that they provide us with some meaningful information

Thus, in order to learn verbs, a child needs time to acquire this grammatical information

(e.g. ‘the dog glipped the cat’ = in the past, dog performed the action, the cat received the action, etc.)

(e.g., "this is a zup" vs. "this is some zup" vs. "this is zupping")