3.2 - Atypical Language Development Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 3.2 - Atypical Language Development Deck (58):
0

Learnability

Is something capable of being learned

1

Does correction seem to have any effect on language correctness?

No

2

Who and what did Zwicky study?

His daughter's use of past participles

3

What is Atypical Language Development?

A language is the impairment or deviant development of comprehension and/or use of a spoken, written, and/or symbol system.

Dr. Ingram doesn't want us to know this He finds that definitions don't really tell us much of anything other than the fact that there's some problem with language development

4

What do we mean we we say language development is Impaired

There is a delay

The child cannot do something they should be able to do

5

What do we mean we we say language development is Deviant?

There is a larger problem with language

Disordered

Atypical patterns

6

Language impairment involve (1) the ______, (2) the ______ and/or (3) the ______ in communication.

Form of language

Content of language

Function of language in communication

7

What is the form of language?

Phonology

Morphology

Syntax

8

What is the content of language?

Semantics

9

What is the function of language?

Pragmatics

10

What is Typology?

Atypical language development may occur in a wide range of contexts

11

Does each type of atypical language development needs to be studied individually?

Yes

12

What is the cause of atypical language development?

Dysfunction of the brain centers for language and cognition

13

What are the Phonological Etiologies of atypical language development?

Fluency

Voice

Cleft palate

Dysarthria

Developmental phonology

14

What is Fluency?

Rate & Rhythm

15

What is Voice?

Larynx

16

What can be caused by cleft palate?

Hypernasality

17

What is Dysarthria?

Problems with the execution of speech

18

What is developmental phonology?

How kids learn their phonology normally and what happens when they don't

19

What debate surrounds issues of Fluency?

Is it a Motor Problem or a Language Problem?

20

What is transitional dysfluency?

Kids lose fluency for a small period of time then it comes back

Can occur during a period of rapid grammatical development.

There's just too much going on. This creates a processing bottleneck.

21

When does transitional dysfluency tend to occur?

Around 3;0

22

How does Dysfluency occur in Bilingualism?

May occur in one language but not the other

23

What kind of errors may occur in dysfluency?

(4)

Sound or syllable repetitions

Whole word repetitions

Sound prolongations

Pauses

24

What sort of dysfluency is seen in a bilingual's less dominant language?

Pauses (buying time)

25

What sort of dysfluency is seen in a bilingual's dominant language

Repetitions (trying to get it out)

26

What is Gross inclusion?

Errors are made across many phonemes

Example: /t/ is used for all fricatives

27

What are Unique sounds?

Nasal snort

Lateral fricatives

Ingressive /s/

Etc.

28

Ingressive /s/ an probably an ______.

Iatrogenic effect

Was probably a result of language therapy

29

What is an iatrogenic effect?

A negative impact of a medical treatment

Usually comes from making the kid make something they are not ready to make

30

Someone with Prosodic Difficulties will most likely have issues with ______.

Stress & Timing

31

In English, word stress is typically a ______ syllable followed by a ______ syllable.

Strong

Weak

32

In English, sentence stress is usually a ______ syllable followed by a ______ one.

Weak

Strong

33

In Dr Ingram's example of the woman with epilepsy, she was using ______ stress at the ______.

Word

Sentence level

34

What are five atypical language etiologies?

Specific Language Impairment

Mental Retardation

Autism

Acquired Brain Injury

Hearing Impairment

35

What are Specific Language Impairment?

Hearing within normal limits

No organic abnormalities

Cognition within normal limits

The impairment is specific to language

36

Who coined the term "Specific Language Impairment"?

Larry Leonard

37

What did Judith Johnston show?

That kids with SLI do perform worse on other kids on cognitive tasks but it's not bad enough to be noticed

38

What's the difference between Delay vs. Impairment?

Delay = late talkers

Impairment = language is unlike that of other younger, typical children

39

Do children with SLI show excessive use of single word utterances?

Yes

40

Do children with SLI show greater omission of verb inflections (Past tense {-ed}, Present tense {-s})?

Yes

41

Do children with SLI show less complex verb phrases?

Yes

42

Basically, for children with SLI, language is more ______.

Simplified

43

How does Mental Retardation affect language?

Their language difficulties are greater than language matched typical children

44

Do children with Mental Retardation show shorter, less complex sentences?

Yes

45

Do children with Mental Retardation show restricted word meanings?

Yes

46

Do children with Mental Retardation show slow vocabulary growth?

Yes

47

Do children with Mental Retardation show articulation problems?

Yes

48

Does Autism tend to produce severe language impairment?

Yes

49

Do children with Autism commonly invert pronouns (I = you)?

Yes

50

Do children with Autism commonly exhibit concrete speech?

Yes

51

Do children with Autism commonly produce atypical descriptions?

Yes

52

Does Autism commonly exhibit a wide range of possible manifestations?

Yes

53

Do children with Cochlear Implants have problems with problems with fricatives and non-visible sounds?

Yes

54

Do children with Cochlear Implants often exhibit low intelligibility?

Yes

55

Do children with Cochlear Implants often show a high success rate in sound production but with low intelligibility?

Yes

56

Are normally hearing kids more accurate on final fricatives or initial fricatives?

Final Fricatives

57

Are CI kids more accurate on final fricatives or initial fricatives?

Initial Fricatives