Anatomy and Physiology VIII Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Anatomy and Physiology VIII Deck (25)
1

What lesion is characteristically associated with Chorea?

Basal ganglia (e.g. Huntington's) (p.417)

2

What lesion is characteristically associated with Athetosis?

Basal ganglia (e.g. Huntington's) (p.417)

3

What condition is characteristically associated with resting tremor?

Parkinson's disease (p.417)

4

What lesion is characteristically associated with Intention tremor?

Cerebellar dysfunction (p.417)

5

How is essential tremor (postural tremor) treated?

Patients often self medicate with EtOH which decreases tremor amplitude; treatment includes B-blockers and primidone (p.417)

6

Name the six key functional areas of the frontal lobe.

Motor speech (Broca's area; dominant hemisphere); Frontal association areas; Frontal eye fields; Premotor area (part of extrapyramidal circuit); Principal motor area; Principle sensory areas (p.418)

7

What is the function of Broca's area and where is it located?

Motor speech centre. It is located in the frontal lobe of the dominant hemisphere (p.418)

8

Name one important functional area of the parietal lobe.

Arcuate fasciculus (p.418)

9

Name one important functional area of the occipital lobe.

Principal visual cortex (p.418)

10

Name two important functional areas of the temporal lobe.

Primary auditory cortex; Associative auditory cortex (Wernicke's area; dominant hemisphere) (p.418)

11

What is the function of Wernicke's area and where is it located?

Associative Auditory Cortex. It is located in the temporal lobe of the dominant hemisphere (p.418)

12

What separates the frontal lobe from the parietal lobe?

The central sulcus (p.418)

13

What separates the frontal lobe from the temporal lobe?

The sylvian fissure (p.418)

14

What is the sylvian fissure?

Fissure separating the frontal from the temporal lobe (p.418)

15

What is the central sulcus?

Sulcus separating the frontal from the parietal lobe (p.418)

16

Describe the organization of the primary motor cortex.

Lower body is more medial; upper body/ head is lateral (p.418)

17

What vascular lesion would be implicated by a deficit in lower extremity sensation or movement?

Damage to the anterior cerebral artery (p.418)

18

What condition is associated with bilateral lesions of the amygdala?

Kluver-Bucy syndrome (p.419)

19

Lesions to what area of the brain cause Kluver-Bucy syndrome?

Bilateral lesions to the amygdala (p.419)

20

What are the symptoms of Kluver-Bucy syndrome?

Hyperorality, hypersexuality, disinhibited behaviour (p.419)

21

What condition is Kluver-Bucy syndrome associated with?

HSV-1 (p.419)

22

What symptoms are associated with lesions to the frontal lobe?

Disinhibition and deficits in concentration, orientation, and judgement; may have reemergence of primative reflexes (p.419)

23

What symptoms are associated with lesions to the right parietal lobe?

Spatial neglect syndrome (agnosia of the contralateral side of the world) (p.419)

24

What symptoms are associated with lesions to the reticular activating system (midbrain)?

Reduced levels of arousal and wakefulenss (e.g. coma) (p.419)

25

What syndrome is associated with bilateral lesions of the Mamillary bodies?

Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (p.419)