Anatomy and Physiology XXIV Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Anatomy and Physiology XXIV Deck (25)
1

What signs and symptoms are characteristic of a CN X lesion?

Uvular deviates away from the side of the lesion. Weakened side collapses and uvula points away (p.436)

2

What signs and symptoms are characteristic of a CN XI lesion?

Weakness in turning head to contralateral side of lesion (SCM). Shoulder droop on side of lesion (trapezius) (p.436)

3

What signs and symptoms are characteristic of a CN XII LMN lesion?

Tongue deviates towards the side of the lesion due to weakened tongue muscles on the affected side (p.436)

4

Describe the general function of the SCM muscle.

The SCM contracts to help to turn the head to the opposite side (p.436)

5

What are the rinne test results in conductive hearing loss?

Abnormal (BC> AC) (p.436)

6

What are the rinne test results in sensorineural hearing loss?

Normal (AC> BC) (p.436)

7

What is the pathophysiology associated with noise-induced hearing loss?

Damage to stereocilliated cells in the organ of Corti (p.436)

8

Name three types of hearing loss.

Conductive, sensorineural, noise-induced (p.436)

9

What type of hearing is lost first in noise-induced hearing loss?

Loss of high frequency hearing (p.436)

10

What can cause immediate noise induced hearing loss?

Sudden, extremely loud noises due to tympanic membrane rupture (p.436)

11

What are the weber test results in conductive hearing loss?

Localizes to affected ear (p.436)

12

What are the weber test results in sensorineural hearing loss?

Localizes to unaffected ear (p.436)

13

Describe the physical findings associated with a facial UMN lesion.

Contralateral paralysis of the lower face; forehead is spared due to bilateral UMN innervation (p.437)

14

What causes a UMN facial lesion?

Lesion of the motor cortex or connection between the cortex and facial muscles (p.437)

15

Describe the physical findings associated with a facial LMN lesion.

Ipsilateral paralysis of the upper and lower face (p.437)

16

What causes a facial nerve palsy?

Complete destruction of the facial nucleus or its branchial efferent fibers (the actual facial nerve fibers). Can occur idiopathically and gradual recovery is achieved in most cases (p.437)

17

What physical symptoms are associated with a facial nerve palsy?

Peripheral ipsilateral facial paralysis with the inability to close the eye on the involved side (p.437)

18

Name seven conditions in which facial nerve palsy is a possible complication.

AIDS, Lyme disease, herpes simplex, herpes zoster (less commonly), sarcoidosis, tumors, diabetes (p.437)

19

What is an idiopathic facial nerve palsy called?

Bell's palsy (p.437)

20

What are the muscles of mastication?

Masseter, Temporalis, Medial pterygoid, lateral pterygoid (p.437)

21

Which muscles are used to close the jaw?

Masseter, Temporalis, Medial pterygoid (p.437)

22

Which muscles are used to open the jaw?

Lateral pterygoid (p.437)

23

What nerve innervates the muscles of mastication?

Mandibular branch of CN V (p.437)

24

What muscle lowers the jaw?

Lateral pterygoid (p.437)

25

What is a refractive error of the eye?

Impaired vision that improves with glasses (p.438)