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Flashcards in CNS Infections II Deck (50)
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1

where does Haemophilus influenzae get its virulence

pili, LPS, capsule (polyribitol phosphate)

2

biology of heamophilus influenzae

non motile gram neg rod, fastidious [uses X (heme) and V (NAD) factor]

3

clinical features of h. influenzae

-slower onset (3-4 days)
-follows: nasopharyngitis, sinusitus, otitis media
-1/3 survivors have neurological sequel

4

prevention of haemophilus influenzae

vaccine: herbix

5

problem with vaccination of h. influenzae

it is specific for the capsule of h. influenzae but new strains are now unencapsulated

6

who gets the listeria monocytogenes strain of meningitis

– Infants
– Adults >60y, alcoholics, cancer patients, renal transplant
-those who drink unpasteurized milk

7

biology of listeria monocytogenes (include virulence factor)

gram positive rod
virulence factors: internalin A and B, listeriolysin O

8

functions of internalin A and B and listeriolysin O

internalins - helps bacteria attach to host
listerolysin - form spores that help bacteria invade cells

9

clinical features of listeria monocytogenes

– Subclinical-gastrointestinal like
– Neonatal
– Immunocompromised

10

transmission of strep agalactiae

it is seen in newborns so vertical transmission from pregnant women who 15-35% of them are asymptomatic

11

Facultative Gram-negative bacilli

Klebsiella, E. coli, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa

12

how does one get the facultative gram neg bacilli

head trauma or neurosurgery

13

how does one get a staphylococci CNS infection

early post neurosurgical/post-trauma hence why it is so uncommon

14

underlying conditions that lead to staphylococci CNS infections

– Diabetes mellitus
– Alcoholism
– Chronic renal failure (hemodialysis)

15

how does staph epidermidis get to the CNS

uses CSF shunts

16

what is a health care related CNS infection

MRSA

17

treponema pallidum can lead to what CNS infections

syphilis and spirocheteal meningitis

18

clinical neurosyphilis

– Syphilitic meningitis (0.3-2.4% untreated cases)
– Meningovascular syphilis
– Parenchymatous neurosyphilis
– Gummatous neurosyphilis (rare)

19

Borrelia burgdorferi can lead to what infection

Lyme infection

20

special feature of borrelia burgodorferi
clinical features of borrelia burgodorferi

spirochete
2-10 weeks post erythema migrans

21

symptoms of viral causes of meningitis

-acute benign, self limiting, monophasic
-cranial neuropathy and raised intracranial pressure

22

most common cause of viral meningitis in US

enterovirus

23

pathogenesis of viral causes of meningitis

mucosal surface colonization RTI/GIT --> viremia --> CNS invasion --> virus spread within the CNS

24

who gets non polio enterovirus

infants and young children with no previous exposure and immunity

thought it is part of adult normal flora

25

who gets mump virus

non immunized population (meningoencephalitis)

26

feature of mump virus

benign and self limiting

27

what are the late viruses

herpes

28

most common herpes virus in CNS infection

HSV 2

29

what are the herpes virus associated with CNS infections

HSV, VZV, CMV, EBV, HHV 6, 7, 8

30

virus associated with roseola infantum

HHV6