Enterobacteriaeae II Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Enterobacteriaeae II Deck (28)
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1

How do Shigella differ from E. coli?

shigella: lactose NEG
ecoli: lactose POS

Shigella also does not produce gas and is non-motile (will not grow outside of stick in agar)

2

How is Shigella transmitted

person to person via fecal oral

3

What are the 5 Fs of shigella transmission?

food
flies
fingers
fomites
feces

4

Who are the highest risk for shigella?

day care
male homosexuals

5

Where does shigella replicate?

cytoplasm (gest in via phagocytic vacuole)

6

How does Shigella attach and get into a cell?

via a virulent plasmid

7

What is the clinical syndrome associated with shigella?

bacillary dysentery
(ab cramps, tenesmus, pus/blood in stool)

8

What is the most common shigella?

shigella sonnei

9

True or false: shigella need a low inoculum to cause disease

TRUE (fewer than 200 organisms)

10

What infection is commonly contracted from snakes?

Edwardsiella tarda

11

What are the clinical syndromes caused by E. tarda

gastroenteritis (watery diarrhea progressing to typhoid like with bloody diarrhea)

can be mistaken for salmonellosis and IBD (crohns)

12

Where is salmonella found?

lower animals for nontyphoid strains

humans for typhi

13

What are 5 characteristics of salmonella?

1) non-lactose fermenter
2) produces hydrogen sulfide (black)
3) transmission via improper food handling
4) found in humans and livestock
5) secondary person-to-person transmission

14

What are 2 common sources of salmonella?

poultry and eggs

15

What are 5 big clinical syndromes associated with salmonella?

1) asymptomatic carrier state
2) febrile gastroenteritis (most common)
3) enteric fever (typhoid caused by S. typhi - 4 week illnesst)
4) Septicemia (no major GI involvement, common in patients with underlying chronic problems)
5) Focal infections (osteomyelitis, meningitis, brain abscess, endocarditis)

16

What are some clinical manifestations of salmonella enteric fever?

fever (temp-pulse dissociation), headache, rose spots, constipation)

17

How do you diagnose positive salmonella bacteremia?

positive blood cultures

18

What is the treatment for salmonella bacteremia?

third generation cephalosporin

19

What is unique about the disease timeline of S. typhi?

lasts 4 weeks
first 2 - incubation/bacteremic (increasing fever)
last 2 - GI symptoms

20

What are 2 important citrobacter syndromes?

nosocomial UTI and resp tracts of hospitalized patients
endocarditis

21

What is C. koseri implicated in?

meningitis and brain abscess in neonates

22

What does K. rhinoscleromatis cause?

chronic granulomatous disease involving mucosa of upper resp tract

23

What does K. ozaenae cause?

atrophic rhinitis

24

What does K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca cause?

lobar pneumonia - destructive changes, necrosis, hemorrhage

25

What are 2 key features of proteeae?

1) swarming (on blood agar)
2) Urease positive

also lactose neg

26

What organism is known to produce highly alkaline urea which leads to renal calculi?

P. mirabilis

27

What is a key feature of yersinia enterocolitica?

pinpoint colonies on macconkey at 24 h

28

What organism is a huge reservoir for Yersinia enterocolitica for humans?

pigs

(diarrhea after eating chitterlings)