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Jonathan's Locomotor > Fever > Flashcards

Flashcards in Fever Deck (24):
1

What happens if the body temperature is too high?

there may be abnormal neuronal function, or even brain seizures

2

When is the body temperature the lowest throughout the day

in the morning (highest in afternoon)

3

Where is the regulatory centre for body temperature

anterior hypothalamus

4

T/F Oral temperature is more accurate than ear temperature

False

5

How does fever cause weight loss

Fever takes a lot of energy, so long period of fever will burn fat and muscles, leading to weight loss

6

How is fever a survival mechanism?

Some enzymes work better at high temperature. We put up temperature to combat infection s

7

Briefly describe the fever pathogenesis

inflammation => release of TNFa, IL-1, INY => cause local release of PGE2 => reset temperature set-point

8

What is rigor

feeling of intense cold and uncontrollable shivering

9

How does rigor occur with fever?

Because the temp set-point is raised. Body achieves it by peripheral vasoconstriction, so the body gets cold

10

How does meningococcus lead to septacaemia?

they are normal flora of the nose and throat, and can get into the bloodstream through mucosa to cause overwhelming sepsis

Fever at the start, followed by severe hypotension

11

T/F Falciparum malaria can present days after initial infection

False, it has a short liver phase

12

How does sphenoectomy sepsis occur?

remove the spleen = unable to deal with encapsulated organisms = sepsis

13

What's toxic shock syndrome?

staph and strep release toxin that act as superantigens to over-stimulate T cells. Patients get overwhelming T cell response

14

Which organism causes necrotising soft tissue infections

Group A strep

15

how can staph aureus endocarditis be fatal?

the bacteria chew up the valves, leading to embolism and acute heart failure

16

Is CRP is good marker of fever caused by septacaemia?

No, it rises up slowly, so may not be a good marker for acute diseases

17

What's the most common cause of fever due to contact with toddlers?

CMV, as it replicates in urine

18

How can FBE indicate whether the infection is bacterial or viral

bacterial = neutrophilia
viral = lymphocytosis

19

What is ESR

how fast red cells fall in the blood. It goes up with neurophilia as there are white cells in the blood

20

When can we characterised someone as having fever (how far above baseline temperature)

38.3

21

When can we characterise someone as having pyrexia of unknown origin?

prolonged illness over 2-3 weeks
fever of above 38.3 on several occasions
no diagnosis after investigation

22

What is a common cause of PUO from someone with travel history

TB

23

What are the differentials of PUO?

infection
autoimmune (connective tissue disorder)
Malignancies

24

Which malignancy can cause prolonged fever

lymphoma