MSK - The Cubital Fossa Flashcards Preview

ESA 2 > MSK - The Cubital Fossa > Flashcards

Flashcards in MSK - The Cubital Fossa Deck (14):
1

What is the lateral border of the cubital fossa?

The medial border of the brachioradialis

2

What is the medial border of the cubital fossa?

The lateral border of pronator teres

3

What is the superior border of the cubital fossa?

The imaginary line between the two epicondyles of the humerus

4

What forms the floor of the cubital fossa?

- The brachialis (proximally)

- The supinator (distally)

5

What forms the roof of the cubital fossa?

- Skin and fascia

- Reinforced by bicipital aponeurosis

6

What runs through the roof of the cubital fossa? Why is this relevant?

- Median cubital vein

- Easy access for venepuncture

7

What is the contents of the cubital fossa?

- Radial nerve

- Biceps tendon

- Brachial artery

- Median Nerve

8

Describe the path of the radial nerve in the cubital fossa

- Passes underneath the brachioradialis

- Divides into deep and superficial branches

9

Describe where the brachial artery bifurcates

- Apex of the cubital fossa

- Forms the radial and ulnar arteries

10

Describe the path of the median nerve in the cubital fossa

Leaves the CF between the two heads of the pronator teres

11

Where can the brachial pulse be palpated? Why is this significant?

- Immediately medial to the biceps tendon

- Significant for measuring blood pressure as is location for placing the stethoscope

12

Why is the location of the median cubital vein significant?

- Located superficially at the roof

- Easy access so is common for venepuncture

- Also connects the basilic and cephalic veins

13

Describe a supracondylar fracture. How do these usually occur?

- Transverse fracture between the two epicondyles

- Usually caused by falling of a flexed elbow

14

What can happen as a result of a supracondylar fracture?

- Fragments/swelling can interfere with the blood supply to the forearm by impinging on the brachial artery

- Results in ischaemia

- Ischaemia results in Volkmanns Ischaemic Contracture (flexor muscles become short and fibrotic = uncontrolled hand flexion)

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