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Anatomic pathology > Skin > Flashcards

Flashcards in Skin Deck (352)
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120

Blastomycosis: Histology of spores (3).

8-15 μm, thick-walled, broad-based budding.

121

Paracoccidiomycosis: Histology of spores (2).

6-20 μm, narrow-based budding.

122

Chromoblastomycosis: Histology of spores (3).

6-12 μm, thick-walled, dark-brown and in clusters ("copper pennies").

123

Cryptococcus: Histology of spores.

2-4 μm (4-12 μm with capsule), narrow-based budding.

124

Histoplasmosis: Histology of spores.

2-4 μm, clear halo.

125

Sporotrichosis: Histology of spores.

4-6 μm, round or oval.

126

Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with suppurative and granulomatous inflammation: Differential diagnosis (3).

Deep mycoses.

Atypical mycobacterial infections.

Halogenodermas.

127

Cryptococcus: Alternative histology.

Xanthomatous infiltrate, especially in the immunocompromised.

128

Tuberculoid leprosy: Appearance of granulomas.

Elongated, surrounded by lymphocytes, arranged along neurovascular bundles.

129

Cutaneous leishmaniasis: Causes (3).

Old World: L. tropica.

New World: L. brasiliensis, L. mexicana.

130

Cutaneous leishmaniasis: Detection of parasites in a biopsy (2).

More likely to be seen in early lesions.

Giemsa stain can help.

131

Cutaneous leishmaniasis: Histology of late lesion.

Tuberculoid granulomas and lymphocytes.

Parasites may be undetectable.

132

Rhinoscleroma: Classic cell.

Mikulicz cell: Large histiocyte.

133

Granuloma inguinale:

A. Cause.
B. Inflammatory infiltrate.
C. Classic histologic finding.

A. Calymmatobacterium granulomatis.

B. Histiocytes and neutrophils.

C. Donovan body: Encapsulated, round to oval, 2-3 μm.

134

Leukocytoclastic vasculitis: Typically affected vessel in the skin.

Superficial dermal postcapillary venule.

135

Leukocytoclastic vasculitis: Bacterial cause.

Neisseria meningitidis.

136

Leukocytoclastic vasculitis: Immunofluorescence (2).

Most cases: IgM, C3, and fibrinogen around dermal vessels.

Henoch-Schönlein purpura: IgA.

137

Leukocytoclastic vasculitis: Chronic forms (2).

Erythema elevatum diutinum.

Granuloma faciale.

138

Livedo vasculitis: Anatomic location.

Lower legs.

139

Livedo vasculitis: Histology.

Fibrinoid matter in vessel walls leads to occlusion and ulceration.

Usually little inflammation.

140

Septic vasculitis: Histology.

Thrombi accompany leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

There may be intraepidermal pustules.

141

Causes of noninflammatory vasculitis of small vessels with deposits of pink matter in and around vascular lumens (4).

Monoclonal cryoglobulinemia.

TTP.

Warfarin- or heparin-induced vasculitis.

142

Superficial migratory thrombophlebitis: Associations (3).

Malignancy.

Hypercoagulable states.

Behçet's disease.

143

Superficial migratory thrombophlebitis: Typically affected vessel.

Small or medium-sized vein in deep dermis or subcutis of lower extremity.

144

Superficial migratory thrombophlebitis: Histology (3).

Occluding thrombus.

Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and histiocytes infiltrate muscle of vein.

Recanalization and resorption of thrombus occur with granulomatous reaction.

145

Superficial migratory thrombophlebitis: Histologic distinction from nodular vasculitis.

Nodular vasculitis affects arteries as well as veins.

146

Subcorneal pustular dermatosis: Clinical appearance.

Sterile pustules involving flexural surfaces and axillary and inguinal folds.

Groups of pustules may assume annular or serpiginous patterns.

147

Subcorneal pustular dermatosis: Histology (2).

Neutrophils beneath the stratum corneum and around superficial vessels.

Mild acantholysis may occur.

148

Subcorneal pustular dermatosis: Helpful ancillary tests.

Gram stain to exclude bullous impetigo.

Immunofluorescence to exclude autoimmune bullous diseases.

149

Subcorneal pustular dermatosis: Possible clinical association.

Monoclonal gammopathy, esp. IgA.