5 - Opth - Acute loss of vision - Retinal Vein Occlusion Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 5 - Opth - Acute loss of vision - Retinal Vein Occlusion Deck (13):
1

2 types

central or branch vein occlusion

2

Associated with?

HTN, DM, age, smoking, obesity, raised IOP, Polycythaemia

3

What does it give? via..(secondary to?)
More common than?

unilateral visual loss - 2ndary to ischaemia and macular oedema

more common than arterial occlusion

4

Presentation of Central RVO

-Variable VA -usually global impact

5

What percent is non-ischaemic and ischaemic?

75% non and 25% ischaemic

6

Features of non-ischaemic CRVO

-variable VA
-dilated, tortuous retinal veins
- widespread dotblot/flame haemorrhages

7

Prognosis of non-ischaemic CRVO

good
~50% get near normal vision recovery
~30% progres to ischaemic

8

Features of Ischaemic CRVO

-sudden severe visual loss and more severe retinal signs
- macular oedema
-widespread cotton wool spots
- MARKED RAPD

9

Complications of Ischaemic CRVO

-permanent visual loss
-neo-vascularisation (VEGF) --> risk of vitreous haemorrhage and rubeotic glaucoma (new iris vessels block drainage)

10

Branch retinal vein occlusion - prevalence vs CRVO + one other feature

not emergency
3x more common

11

Presentation of BRVO

reduced VA (often central and worse on waking)
Visual field defects (often altitudinal)

12

Fundoscopic findings (restricted to area drained by affected vein)

-haemorrhage
-cotton wool spots
-venous dilatation
-oedema

13

Prognosis of BRVO

-spontaneous resolution in less severe cases
-neo-vascularisation - treat with laser photocoagulation

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