Ch. 26 Between the Wars Flashcards Preview

AP Euro Vocabulary > Ch. 26 Between the Wars > Flashcards

Flashcards in Ch. 26 Between the Wars Deck (37):
0

The League of Nations

It was the first international organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.[1] Its primary goals, as stated in its Covenant, included preventing wars through collective security and disarmament and settling international disputes through negotiation and arbitration.[2] Other issues in this and related treaties included labour conditions, just treatment of native inhabitants, human and drug trafficking, arms trade, global health, prisoners of war, and protection of minorities in Europe.[3] At its greatest extent from 28 September 1934 to 23 February 1935, it had 58 members.

1

The Dawes plan

The Dawes Plan was an attempt following World War I for the Triple Entente to compromise and collect war reparations debt from Germany. The Dawes Plan (as proposed by the Dawes Committee, chaired by Charles G. Dawes) was an attempt in 1924 to solve the reparations problem, which had bedeviled international politics following World War I and the Treaty of Versailles.

2

Treaty of Locarno


Pact of Locarno, (Dec. 1, 1925), series of agreements whereby Germany, France, Belgium, Great Britain, and Italy mutually guaranteed peace in western Europe. The treaties were initialed at Locarno, Switz., on October 16 and signed in London on December 1.

3

The Kellogg-Briand Pact

The Kellogg-Briand Pact was an agreement to outlaw war signed on August 27, 1928. Sometimes called the Pact of Paris for the city in which it was signed, the pact was one of many international efforts to prevent another World War, but it had little effect in stopping the rising militarism of the 1930s or preventing World War II.

4

The Great Depression

Hit american the worst following the war

5

John Maynard Keynes

John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB, FBA, was a British economist whose ideas have fundamentally affected the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics and informed the economic policies of governments. Wikipedia

6

The new deal

and focused on what historians call the "3 Rs": Relief, Recovery, and Reform. That is Relief for the unemployed and poor; Recovery of the economy to normal levels; and Reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression.[1]

7

Ataturk

Mustafa Kemal Atatürk was a Turkish army officer, reformist statesman, and the first President of Turkey. He is credited with being the founder of the Republic of Turkey. Wikipedia

8

Mohandas Ghandi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was the preeminent leader of Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Wikipedia

9

Benito Mussolini

Italian 1st fascist movement in Europe rebellious child
Well known in Italian socialist circles
Editor of avanti
Led fascism

10

Totalitarianism

Totalitarianism is a political system in which the state holds total authority over the society and seeks to control all aspects of public and private life wherever possible.[1]

11

Fascism

Fascism (/fæʃɪzəm/) is a form of radical authoritarian nationalism[1][2] that came to prominence in early 20th-century Europe. Influenced by national syndicalism, fascism originated in Italy during World War I, combining more typically right-wing positions with elements of left-wing politics,[3] in opposition to liberalism, Marxism, and traditional conservatism. Although fascism is often placed on the far-right within the traditional left–right spectrum, several academics have said that the description is inadequate.[4][5]

12

The blackshirts

Ww1 veteran and students

13

Weimar Republic

Ok

14

Adolph hitler

Nazi guy

15

Mein kampf

Manifesto by Adolfo hitler wrote while in jail

16

Stum... (SA)

Ok

17

NSDAP

Nazi Party: Table of Contents. Adolf Hitler. The Gestapo. The National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP), more commonly known as the Nazi Party, was a political party in Germany between 1920 and 1945.

18

Lebenstraum

Lebensraum. additional territory considered by a nation, especially Nazi Germany, to be necessary for national survival or for the expansion of trade. any additional space needed in order to act, function, etc.

19

Aryanism


While originally meant simply as a neutral ethno-linguistic classification, from the late 19th century onwards the concept of the Aryan race has been used by proponents of ideologically-motivated racism and white supremacism such as in doctrines of Nazism and neo-Nazism. Aryanism developed as a racial ideology that claimed that the Aryan race was a master race

20

Hitler jugend

Youth organization of nazi party

21

Nuremberg laws

At the annual party rally held in Nuremberg in 1935, the Nazis announced new laws which institutionalized many of the racial theories prevalent in Nazi ideology. The laws excluded German Jews from Reich citizenship and prohibited them from marrying or having sexual relations with persons of "German or related blood."

22

Gestapop

Secret State Police") was the official secret police of Nazi Germany and German-occupied Europe. Hermann Göring formed the unit in 1933.

23

Kristallnatch

Attacks of Jews

24

New economic policy

Lenin
Modified version of old capitalist system
Peasants allowed to sell their produce
Can operate heavy industry

25

Joseph Stalin

Joined the Bolsheviks and staged dating bank robbery to obtain funds

Socialism in 1 country

26

Five years plan

Launched by Stalin
Goal to transform Union
Emphasized maximum production of capital goods

27

Collective farms

collective farm definition. In socialist or communist countries, such as the former Soviet Union, a collective is a cooperative association of farmers who work land owned by the state but who own most of their own farm implements.

28

Francisco Franco

Revolted against gov. And wanted a brutal and bloody civil war

29

The Spanish civil war

Fought between republicans and nationalists.

Nationalist won

30

Dadaism

Dada (/ˈdɑːdɑː/) or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century. Dada in Zurich, Switzerland, began in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter, but the height of New York Dada was the year before, in 1915.[1] The term anti-art, a precursor to Dada, was coined by Marcel Duchamp around 1913 when he created his first readymades.[2] Dada, in addition to being anti-war, had political affinities with the radical left and was also anti-bourgeois.[3]

31

Surrealism

a 20th-century avant-garde movement in art and literature that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images.

32

Arnold Schoenberg

Arnold Schoenberg or Schönberg was an Austrian composer and painter, associated with the expressionist movement in German poetry and art, and leader of the Second Viennese School. Wikipedia

33

James Joyce

James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century.

34

Virginia Woolf

Literature

35

Stream of consciousness

a person's thoughts and conscious reactions to events, perceived as a continuous flow. The term was introduced by William James in his Principles of Psychology (1890).
a literary style in which a character's thoughts, feelings, and reactions are depicted in a continuous flow uninterrupted by objective description or conventional dialogue. James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Marcel Proust are among its notable early exponents.

36

Werner Heisenberg and the uncertain principle

Ok