Chapter 20 - Acute Diabetic Emergencies Flashcards Preview

EMS > Chapter 20 - Acute Diabetic Emergencies > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 20 - Acute Diabetic Emergencies Deck (11):
1

diabetes mellitus (DM)

a disease in which the normal relationship between glucose and insulin is altered. See also type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes

2

diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)

a condition typically found in type 1 diabetics where the blood glucose level is excessively elevated and insulin level is extremely low to absent, which causes glucose to be excreted in the urine, dehydrating the patent, and causes the body to metabolize fat for energy, producing ketones and creating an acidic environment.

3

glucagon

a hormone secreted by the pancreas that raises the blood glucose level by stimulating the liver to convert stored glycogen and other substances into glucose.

4

glucose

a form of sugar that is the body's basic source of energy

5

hyperglycemia

high blood glucose. A blood glucose level greater than 120 mg/dL

6

hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS)

a condition typically found in type 2 diabetics where the blood glucose level rises excessively, causing loss of large amounts of fluid from glucose spilling into the urine, leading to sever dehydration.

7

hypoglycemia

low blood glucose. A blood glucose level of 60 mg/dL with signs or symptoms of hypoglycemia or a blood glucose level of less that 50 mg/dL with or without signs or symptoms of hypoglycemia.

8

insulin

a hormone secreted by the pancreas that lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the movement of glucose from the blood into the cells.

9

oral glucose

a form of sugar often given as a gel, by mouth, to raise the blood glucose level

10

type 1 diabetes

a form of diabetes in which the patients pancreas typically does not produce or secrete any insulin. Also called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). See also diabetes mellitus (DM)

11

type 2 diabetes

a form of diabetes where the pancreas continues to produce and secrete insulin; however, the insulin is not completely effective in controlling the blood glucose level. Type 2 diabetes does not usually require the patent to take insulin and can, instead, be regulated by diet, exercise, and drugs other than insulin. Also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). See also diabetes mellitus (DM)