Grief Counseling Exam 2 Flashcards Preview

Trakesha's 4th Quarter > Grief Counseling Exam 2 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Grief Counseling Exam 2 Deck (51):
1

FACTORS THAT MAY COMPLICATE GRIEF

relational factors
circumstantial factors
historical factors
personality factors
social factors

2

FACTORS THAT MAY COMPLICATE GRIEF
 Highly ambivalent relationship with unexpressed hostility. (Unresolved stuff).
 The death may open old wounds
 In highly dependent relationships the death may lead to a desperate sense of helplessness.

relational factors

3

FACTORS THAT MAY COMPLICATE GRIEF
 The loss is uncertain (MIA’s, no remains found)
 Multiple losses from plane crashes, natural disasters, fire may lead to bereavement overload.

circumstantial factors

4

FACTORS THAT MAY
COMPLICATE GRIEF
 People who have had complicated grief reactions in the past will have a higher probability of a complicated reaction in the present
 There is interest in the influence of early parental loss on the development of subsequent complicated grief reactions in other losses.

historical factors

5

FACTORS THAT MAY COMPLICATE GRIEF
 Some people are unable to tolerate extremes of emotional distress
 One’s self-concept such as being the “strong one” in the family may hinder grief

personality factors

6

FACTORS THAT MAY COMPLICATE GRIEF
 The death is socially unspeakable (suicide, homicide, AIDS)
 The loss is socially negated (abortion)
 The absence of a social support network may cause complications

social factors

7

TYPES OF ABNORMAL GRIEF

Complicated (chronic, unresolved) grief
Delayed grief reaction
Exaggerated grief (Worden)
Masked grief

8

TYPES OF ABNORMAL GRIEF
grief extending over a long period of time without resolution

Complicated (chronic, unresolved) grief

9

TYPES OF ABNORMAL GRIEF
inhibited, suppresses or postponed response to a loss

Delayed grief reaction

10

TYPES OF ABNORMAL GRIEF
persons are usually conscious of the relationship of the reaction of the death, but the reaction to the current experience is excessive and disabling

Exaggerated grief (Worden)

11

TYPES OF ABNORMAL GRIEF
occurs when persons experience symptoms and behaviors which cause them difficulty but they do not see or recognize the fact that these are related to the loss

Masked grief

12

a deliberate act of self-destruction

Suicide

13

an unsuccessful suicide attempt

Suicidal gesture

14

thoughts (idea) about committing suicide

Suicidal ideation

15

studied thousands of cases of suicide to demonstrate his theory that a person commits suicide because of the influence of society. His theory on suicide includes four types of suicides.

Emile Durkheim

16

four types of suicide

anomic suicide
fatalistic suicide
altruistic suicide
egoistic suicide

17

one of the four types of suicide; when a person commits suicide during times of adverse conditions, such as war or financial hardship, when the rules of society don’t seem to apply

anomic suicide

18

one of the four types of suicide; when a person commits suicide because one feel over-regulated or over-controlled. They feel there is no other way out

fatalistic suicide

19

one of the four types of suicide; when a person commits suicide due to a high sense of group involvement or out of a sense of duty for a cause (Kamikaze pilots in WWII, suicide bombers)

altruistic suicide

20

one of the four types of suicide; when a person commits suicide sue to feelings of being a loner or feeling that one does not fit into society

egoistic suicide

21

The term is derived from the Greek words for “well/good” and “death”

euthanasia

22

two types of euthanasia

passive
active

23

the withholding of life sustaining drugs or treatment, such as kidney dialysis, from a patient who is terminally ill

passive euthanasia

24

taking active measures, such as Dr. Kevorkian did, to end the life of a terminally ill patient

active euthanasia

25

historically an inn for travelers, especially one kept by a religious order; also used to indicate a concept designed to treat patients with a life-limiting condition

Hospice

26

CHILD’S UNDERSTANDING OF DEATH
• Birth to three years

no comprehension

27

CHILD’S UNDERSTANDING OF DEATH
• Three to five years

o Unable to understand the finality of death
o Death is like sleep or like taking a long journey

28

CHILD’S UNDERSTANDING OF DEATH
• Five to nine years

o May understand that death is final but may not accept it as something that happens to everyone, often personify death
o The age where children tend to personify death—see it as a figure of some sort (boogeyman, grim reaper)

29

CHILD’S UNDERSTANDING OF DEATH
• Nine years and above

o Understand that death is final and evitable, and that everyone dies; including themselves

30

EXPLAINING DEATH TO CHILDREN
• What not to say!!!

o Make believe stories or fairy tales
o Something you don’t believe yourself
o Mother has gone on a long journey
o “God” took daddy away because he wants and loves the good in heaven
o Daddy is now in heaven
o Grandma died because she was sick
o To die is to sleep

31

EXPLAINING DEATH TO CHILDREN
• What to say!!!

o Share your own religious convictions
o Speak in concrete terms rather than philosophical ones
o Grant permission to cry and express feelings
o Acknowledge when you do not know the answer

32

**

The funeral is an important occasion in the life of the family. A child should have the same right as other members of the family to attend the funeral, offer his or her last respects and express love and devotion.

33

at approximately what age, should a child be encourage to attend

seven

34

GRIEF AND FAMILY SYSTEMS- WILLIAM WORDEN

1. Functional position or role the deceased played in the family
2. Emotional integration of the family
3. How families facilitate or hinder emotional expression

35

feeling of depressed and hopeless after the loss of a significant other is a common and usually transient phenomenon for many bereaved.

Clinical depression

36

another common response following loss. Serious alcoholism or other substance abuse that develops or is exacerbated by a death would be included here under exaggerated grief reactions. There are some who suffer loss, usually of a catastrophic nature, who develop signs and symptoms of Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Anxiety

37

patients experience symptoms and behaviors that cause them difficulty but they do not recognize the fact that these symptoms or behaviors are related to the loss. Generally, turns up in one of two ways: a physical symptom or it is masked through some type of aberrant or maladaptive behavior

Masked Grief Reactions

38

most feeling experienced by both family and friends.

Shame

39

another common feeling – Families take responsibility of the action of the deceased and have a gnawing feeling that there was something they should or could have done to prevent the death. (Can sometime be manifested by blame)

guilt

40

some people hand their own sense of being culpability by projecting their guilt onto others and blaming them for the death

blame

41

is a common response after suicide. A primary fear among survivors of suicide is of their own self-destructive impulses. Many seem to carry with them a sense of fate or doom. Especially, true of sons of suicide victims: Characteristically they find life lacking a certain zing. They tend to feel more rootless than most, even in a notoriously rootless society. They are squeamishly incurious about the past, numbly certain about the future, to this grisly extent they suspect that they too will probably kill themselves.

Fear

42

Sudden deaths

- Unreality about the loss
- Guilt Feelings a second feature that is often found in cases of sudden death.
- Need to blame – can be extremely strong.
- Involvement of medical and legal authorities, especially in cases of accidents or homicide

43

fifth special feature – elicits on the part of the survivors – this type of death is an assault on our sense of power and our sense of orderliness

Helplessness

44

this can trigger the “Fight or Flight” response in a person and lead to a very agitated depression

Unfinished business

45

Three main areas to be concerned when assessing a family

functional position or role the deceased played in the family
the emotional integration of the family
understand the value families place on emotions and the kinds of communication patterns that give a person permission to express or not express feelings

46

5 types parents may experience due to the loss of a child

cultural guilt
causal guilt
moral guilt
survival guilt
recovery guilt

47

Society expects parents to be guardians of their children and to take care of them.

cultural guilt
moral guilt

48

parents were responsible for the death of the child through some real or perceived negligence.

Causal Guilt

49

characterized by the parent feeling that the death of the child was due to some moral infraction in their present or earlier life experience.

moral guilt

50

may also be found among bereaved parents

survival guilt

51

parents feel guilty when they move through their grief and want to get on with their lives. Recovery somehow dishonors the memory of their dead child and they society may judge them negatively

recovery guilt