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Biology of The Mind > Neural Integration > Flashcards

Flashcards in Neural Integration Deck (14):
0

What is saltatory conduction?

In myelinated neurones the action potential jumps from one node of ranvier to another as the it cannot pass through the myelin. This is much faster and significantly enhanced.

1

What is neural integration?

Decision making.
Neurones receive info in EPSPs or IPSPs and integrate in to generate an action potential or not.

2

What are synapses on the soma (axo-somatic) often?

Inhibitory

3

What are the types of summation?

Temporal- addition of two close occurring EPSP
Spatial- 2 EPSP below the threshold= 1 above

4

Where does integration occur?

In the axon hillock

5

Which synapse connection is modulatory and control the NT release?

Axo-axonic: controls the calcium influx in the presynaptic neurone

6

Which synapse connection occurs in the dendritic spines and shafts and is commonly excitatory?

Axo-dendritic

7

What are the five types of synaptic connections in the CNS?

Axodendritic, axo somatic, axoaxonic, soma-somatic and dendro-dendritic.

8

What do inhibitory neurones do?

Decrease the activity of the target cells.

Eg. GABA

9

What do excitatory neurones do?

Increase the activity of the target cells.

Eg. Glutamate

10

What does a higher frequency mean?

More NT release which produces a stronger signal.

11

What is the downside of the all-or-nothing firing or an action potential?

Little information can be carried in the signal.

12

What happens when NT builds up is more as released?

An ongoing response is generated

13

How can activity of synapse be observed?

Via drugs or stimulation