Reading: Music after Beethoven: Romanticism and The Early Romantics Flashcards Preview

J - MUSIC 101 > Reading: Music after Beethoven: Romanticism and The Early Romantics > Flashcards

Flashcards in Reading: Music after Beethoven: Romanticism and The Early Romantics Deck (28)
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1

The Romantic period was a period where there was strict adherence to musical rules. True or false?

False.

2

What was a downside to the institutionalization of concert life?

The public tended to be more conservative than the old aristocrats.

3

What was the main artistic value in the Romantic era?

The integrity of personal feeling.

4

Romantic Melody

More emotional, effusive, and demonstrative.

5

Romantic Harmony

Learned to use harmony to underpin melody in such a way as to bring out its emotionality. Chromaticism.

6

Chromaticism

A musical style employing all or many of the twelve notes of the chromatic scale much of the time.

7

Rubato

"Robbed" time; the free treatment of meter in performance.

8

Tempo Rubato

Robbed time -- some time has been stolen from the beat.

9

How did musicians of the Romantic era improvise?

They did not make up notes, but they played with rhythm.

10

What was new with instruments in the Romantic era?

Technological improvements, new combinations of instruments. Conductors came to the fore.

11

Program Music

A piece of instrumental music associated with a story or other extramusical idea.

12

Was program music new to the Romantic era?

No, but the Romantic era contributed to its new importance and prestige.

13

What are the two types of program music?

1. Music that tells a story, with the story being the program.
2. Captures the general flavour of a mood associated with some extramusical state, concept, or personality.

14

Why is program music contradictory?

On one hand, Romantics considered purely instrumental music as the highest form of art, but on the other, program music was embraced.

15

What was the struggle with form in the Romantics?

They tried to break existing moulds, but still had to avoid real formlessness in order to gold the attention of an audience.

16

Miniature

A short, evocative composition for piano or for piano and voice, composed in the Romantic period.

17

Did compositions get shorter in the Romantic period?

Not necessarily. There were grandiose compositions that got significantly longer.

18

Thematic Unity

Increasing tendency in the Romantic to maintain some of the same thematic material throughout whole works, even (or especially) when these works were in many movements.

19

Thematic Transformation

A variation-like procedure applied to short themes in the various sections of Romantic symphonic poems and other works.

20

What were the two main influences for early Romantic composers?

Beethoven and literary Romanticism.

21

Lied

German for "song"; a special genre of Romantic songs with piano.

22

Describe the lied's accompaniment:

Nearly always accompanied by piano alone, and accompaniment contributes significantly to the artistic effect.

23

Describe the text of a lied:

Usually a Romantic poem of some merit.

24

Describe the mood of a lied:

Intimacy of expression that is captured by these pieces. Singer and pianist share emotional insight with just you.

25

The text in Erlking is by ___.

Goethe.

26

Through-Composed Song

A song with new music for each stanza of the poem; as opposed to strophic song.

27

Strophic

A song in several stanzas, with the same music sung for each stanzas as opposed to through-composed song.

28

Song Cycle

A group of songs connected by a general idea or story, and sometimes also by musical unifying devices.

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