Respiratory Lab [Lab Practical 2] Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Respiratory Lab [Lab Practical 2] Deck (53):
1

The female respiratory values are what percentage smaller than males?

20-25%

2

Male Total Lung Capacity

6,000 ml

3

Male Inspiratory Reserve Volume

3,000 ml

4

Male Tidal Volume

500 ml

5

Male Functional Residual Capacity

2,500 ml

6

Male Inspiratory Capacity

3,500 ml

7

Male Expiratory Reserve Volume

1,000 ml

8

Male Vital Capacity

4,500 ml

9

Male Residual Volume

1,500 ml

10

Tidal Volume (TV)

The amount of air inspired or expired during normal, quiet respiration.

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The amount of air inspired or expired during normal, quiet respiration.

Tidal Volume (TV)

12

The total amount of air one's lungs can possibly hold can be subdivided into

Four Volumes

13

Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV)

The amount of air which can be forcefully inspired above and beyond that taken in during a normal inspiration

14

The amount of air which can be forcefully inspired above and beyond that taken in during a normal inspiration

Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV)

15

Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV)

The maximal amount of air which can be forcefully expired following a normal expiration

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The maximal amount of air which can be forcefully expired following a normal expiration

Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV)

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Residual Volume (RV)

The amount of air which remains trapped in the lungs after a maximal expiratory effort

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The amount of air which remains trapped in the lungs after a maximal expiratory effort

Residual Volume (RV)

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In addition to the four volumes, which do not overlap, there are four ____ which are combinations of two or more volumes

Capacities

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Total Lung Capacity (TLC)

The total amount of air the lungs can contain--the sum of all four volumes

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The total amount of air the lungs can contain--the sum of all four volumes

Total Lung Capacity (TLC)

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Vital Capacity (VC)

The maximal amount of air that can be forcefully expired after a maximum inspiration

23

The maximal amount of air that can be forcefully expired after a maximum inspiration

Vital Capacity (VC)

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Functional Residual Capacity (FRC)

The amount of air remaining in the lungs after a normal expiration

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The amount of air remaining in the lungs after a normal expiration

Functional Residual Capacity (FRC)

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Inspiratory Capacity (IC)

The maximal amount of air which can be inspired after a normal expiration

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The maximal amount of air which can be inspired after a normal expiration

Inspiratory Capacity (IC)

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Spirometer

The instrument we used to measure the respiratory volumes; a lightweight metal bell inverted in a drum filled with water

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The instrument we used to measure the respiratory volumes; a lightweight metal bell inverted in a drum filled with water

Spirometer

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Calculating Tidal Volume

Multiply your Tidal Volume by your Respiratory Rate per minute to give your Respiratory Minute Volume
Respiratory Minute Volume = TV X Breathing Rate
(mL air / min) = TV X (breaths/min)
TV = mL air / breath

31

How did we find tidal volume?

Set spirometer to zero. Take a normal inspiration, place your mouth over the mouthpiece, and exhale a normal expiration into the spirometer

32

How did we find expiratory reserve volume?

Set the spirometer to zero. After a normal expiration, place your mouth over the mouthpiece and forcefully exhale as much air as possible into the spirometer

33

How did we find vital capacity?

Set spirometer to zero. Inhale as deeply as possible; place your mouth over the mouthpiece, hold your nose, and exhale into the spirometer with a maximal effort. Then use the table for predicted vital capacity based on your age, height, and sex

34

How do we calculate the inspiratory reserve volume (IRV)?

Vital Capacity - Tidal Volume - Expiratory Reserve volume

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How do we calculate the Inspiratory Capacity (IC)?

Vital Capacity - Expiratory Reserve Volume

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In this test the subject takes five deep breaths and then holds his breath as long as possible after the last inspiration. Gives an indication of the person's functional respiratory reserve and efficiency of his respiratory system. Often a better index of respiratory reserve than is the traditional vital capacity measurement.

Heymer Test

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Heymer Test

In this test the subject takes five deep breaths and then holds his breath as long as possible after the last inspiration. Gives an indication of the person's functional respiratory reserve and efficiency of his respiratory system. Often a better index of respiratory reserve than is the traditional vital capacity measurement.

38

Normal male values for the Heymer test

50-70 seconds

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Normal female values for the Heymer test

50-60 seconds

40

Measures the volume of gas that passes through it

Dry gas meter

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Bag that collects the air you breath into it

Douglas bag

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Units for Minute Volume (Vm)

ml air / min

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Units for breathing rate (BR)

Breaths / minute

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Units for heart rate (HR)

beats / minute

45

In the respiratory system, the flow of air is called the

Minute Volume (Vm)

46

In the circulatory system, the flow of blood is called the

Cardiac Output (CO)

47

How do we calculate metabolic rate or oxygen consumption (VO2)?

VO2 = (Vm)(CO2i - CO2e) = (CO)(CO2a - CO2v)
ml O2 / min

48

In most resting people, arteriole blood is 100% saturated w/ oxygen, but mixed venous blood is only

60% saturated

49

How did we calculate the oxygen content of arteriole blood (CO2a)?

Assuming you have the average hemoglobin concentration and each gram of hemoglobin can bind with 1.3 ml of O2

CO2a = (13.3 g hemoglobin / 100 ml blood) X (1.3 ml O2 / 1 g hemoglobin)

50

How did we calculate the oxygen content of venous blood (CO2v)?

CO2v = 0.6 (CO2a)

51

In our hw how did we calculate cardiac output (CO)?

CO = VO2 / (CO2a-CO2v)
[ml blood/min]

52

In our hw how did we calculate stroke volume?

SV = CO / HR
[ml blood / beat]

53

In our hw how did we calculate total peripheral resistance (TPR)?

TPR = mean arterial pressure / CO

closely equal to;

[(systolic + 2 diastolic)/3] / CO