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Jason's GI Block > Gastritis > Flashcards

Flashcards in Gastritis Deck (52):
1

sign of past ulcers in stomach?

radial scarring

2

are there normally inflammatory cells in the lamina propria of the stomach?

No.

3

2 ways that stomach protects itself from it's own acid:

bicarbonate mucous 'gel' layer
hydrophobic monolayer

4

5 things that damage stomach mucosal barrier:

H/Pylori
aspirin
NSAIDS
bile
alcohol

5

What is the role of prostaglandins in stomach mucosal barrier? 4 things

inhibit acid secretion
stim bicarb, mucous
increase blood flow
modify inflam

6

Acute gastritis lasts how long usually?

a few days

7

How long does it take for stomach to heal? why?

24-48 hours due to constant regeneration

8

does H pylori heal spontaneously after progressing to chronic?

Nope./

9

Shock or sepsis can do what to stomach?

acute gastritis

10

neutrophils with erosion?

not much bro.

11

Chronic superficial gastritis bacterial infections you see more what?

plasma cells
eosinophils

12

All people in ICU are put on what?

proton pump inhibitors

13

When does an erosion become an ulcer?

once it goes below the muscularis mucosae

14

defining feature of chronic ulcer?

fibrosis in the deep layers

15

acute Ulcers in proximal duodenum from what?

severe burns/trauma

16

acute Ulcers in gastric and duodenum from what? called what?

intracranial injury. Cushing ulcers.

17

proximal duodenal ulcers are called what?

Curling ulcers

18

if you get subactue gastric ulcer with erosion of artery, what clinical manifestation do you see?

haemetemesis

19

What are the 3 main types of chronic gastritis?

autoimmune (rarer)
H.Pylori
Chemical

20

What happens in Autoimmune gastritis?

destruction of acid secreting tubules of parietal cells

21

No parietal cells also mean no intrinsic factor which means?

decreased B12 absorption and defiency

22

What is spared in autoimmune gastritis?

antrum of stomach

23

no parietal cells>hypergastriaemia>linear/nodular hyperplasia> increased risk of?

carcinoidosis

24

How else can B12 be interfered with in autoimmune gastritis?

IF-Ab secretion complexes with B12 preventing absorption

25

What are ECL cells?

neuroendocrine cells

26

Chemical chronic gastritis caused by?

reflux of bile/alkaline
long term aspirin/NSAIDS

27

What happens to mucosa in Chemical chronic gastritis?

disruption of mucus layer
epithelial desquamation

28

what does epithelial desquamation mean in Chemical chronic gastritis?

foveolar hyperplasia with elongation of gastric pits
vasodilation and oedema

29

erosions and ulcers in Chemical chronic gastritis?

yes

30

H. pylori is linked to 2 things:

peptic ulcers
gastric cancers

31

where do H. pylori find their niche?

below the mucus bicarb gel layer of stomach

32

Why are H. pylori good at surviving in stomach?

motile
have adhesins
have urease

33

Acute H. pylori infections bring what kind of immune response?

neutrophilic gastritis
acute inflam (IL-8)

34

What happens to parietal cells after Acute H. pylori infection?

transient hypochlorhydria up to 4 months

35

What do antibodies do with Acute H. pylori infection?

helps but not curative

36

high infection of Acute H. pylori infection means what 2 things?

low rate of clearance
persists for life when established

37

H.Pylori in intercellular junctions?

yes when it's bad

38

H.Pylori for cancer sequence

normal
chronic gastritis
atrophic gastritis
intestinal metaplasia
dysplasia
adenocarcinoma

39

in gastric cancer, there are no more specialized cells in walls of stomach, they are replaced by

lyphoid follicles with germinal centres

40

in antrum predominant H.Pylori gastritis what happens to acid and results?

chronic inflam, polymorphs
H. Pylori colonisation
increased acid
duodenal ulcer

41

in pan-gastritis predominant H.Pylori gastritis what happens to acid and results?

reduced acid
chronic inflam, intestinal metaplasia>adenocarcinoma
gastric ulcer

42

What is MALT?

mucosa associated lymphoid tissue

43

When do you get B-cell lymphoma of MALT?

in H. Pylori chronic pangastritis

44

92% of duodenal ulcer is caused by?

H-pylori

45

25% of gastric ulcer is caused by?

NSAIDS

46

where is the most common site of peptic ulcer?

D1 and antrum

47

3 other common places for peptic ulcers?

1. oesophagus at squamocolumnar junction
2. gastroenterostomy stoma
3. Meckel's diverticulum if H-pylori infected

48

4 layers of chornic peptic ulcer floor?

1. fibrin exudate
2. narrow zone of fibrinoid necrosis
3. granulation tissue
4. fibrosis: endarteritis/hypertrophied nerves

49

4 complications of peptic ulcers

perforation (peritonitis/septicaemia)
haemorrhage (haematemesis)
penetration (into adjacent organ)
stenosis (pyloric canal and obstruction)

50

what happens to the muscosal folds with gastric carcinoma?

obliterated

51

diffuse-type gastric carcinoma (linitis plastica) looks like?

stomach is sharply punched out, no glands for cells and is discohesive.

52

Signet-ring cell carcinoma

form of gastric adenocarcinoma