Myofascial I Flashcards Preview

OMM II > Myofascial I > Flashcards

Flashcards in Myofascial I Deck (42):
1

What are the three significant roles that tensegrity plays?

-Effects on postural stress
-Compensation
-Adaptation and decompensation

2

Why is tensegrity important as a model of fascia?

Little energy for the maintenance of posture/structure

3

What aspects of OMM are reflected by the tensegrity principle?

Functional unit
Self-regulation

4

The balance of the internal functions are reflected in tensegrity how?

Homeostasis

5

The balance of the external structure in response to stress results in what?

Postural changes

6

How does hypermobility in one area affect other areas?

Causes hypomobility elsewhere

7

What causes the pain in plantar fascitis?

Fascial tension causes bone formation on the fascia, creating a hell spur

8

What is the superficial layer of fascia?

Subcutaneous

9

What is the deep layer of fascia? Role?

Investing fascia that compartmentalizes tissues

Neurovascular bundles

10

Periosteum is an example of what layer of fascia?

deep fascial layer

11

Pericardium is an example of what layer of fascia?

subserous fascia

12

Coverings of organs represents what layer of fascia?

subserous

13

What is the function of the contractility of fascia?

creates tension between origins and insertions

14

What are the colloid like properties of fascia?

the gel like ability

15

What causes a loss of the colloid like properties of fascia?

Adhesions--abnormal crosslinking of fascia

16

What are the four functions of fascia?

-Stabilize (posture)
-Coordinates muscles
-Supports organs/muscles
-Aids in circulation

17

How does fascia aid in circulation?

Keeps veins open

18

What is the role of fibroblasts in fascia?

create it

19

What is Wolff's law, and how does it apply to fascia?

Mechanical stress/pressure stimulates fibroblasts to produce collagen to offset stress

20

What happens when fascia cross-links?

Increases strength
Decreases flexibility

21

What are myofascial treatments?

system of diagnosis and treatment that engages continual palpatory feedback to release myofascial tissues

22

What is direct myofascial techniques?

Engaging the restrictive barrier

23

What is the indirect myofascial technique?

tissues guided along the path of least resistance

24

What are the nerves that innervate muscle spindles?

Gamma motor neurons

25

What happens to the nerves with injury?

Leads to persistent afferent excitatory input

26

What does the spinal cord do in response to increased afferent stimulation?

Increased in gamma motor neuron activity, to increase muscle tone, muscle shortening, increased sensitivity to muscle stretch

27

How does MFR treat the increased afferent input into the spinal cord?

Shuts off the cycle by decreasing afferent stimulation

Decreases gamma motor neuron activity

Decrease in muscle stretch

28

What are the three goals of MFT?

-relax muscles
-Increase circulation
-Increased drainage

29

True or false: in MFR, the pt is in charge; we merely facilitate the release

True

30

What are the two ways of indirect release of myofascial stuff?

Takes tissues where it wants to go, and hold

Take it where is wants to go, and continue to follow it

31

Too much pressure with MFR causes what?

Impeded the motion of the tissue

32

What are the four steps of MFR?

1. Assess motion
2. move to pt of ease (neutral)
3. hold to release
4. Reassess

33

What is the principle of facilitated positional release?

Excessive tone on skeletal muscles causes increased resistance

34

For facilitated positional release, the pt should be placed in what position? Why?

Neutral position

Unloads facets

35

What is the next step in FPR after the pt is placed in a neutral position?

Place dysfunction into its freedom of motion

36

How much force should be added with the listening hand? For how long?

3-5 lbs
3-5 seconds

37

What should be done when FPR is finished?

Released and reevaluate

38

True or false: radicular pain is a contraindications to using FPR

True

39

The majority of fascia in the body has what organization? What are the exceptions to this?

Longitudinal

Diaphragms have horizontal

40

True or false: There are no absolute contraindications to MFR

True

41

What are the contraindications to FPR?

-Radicular pain with compression
-Fractures
-Pain

42

how long does it take for a ligament to heal once put back into place?

3 months