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Flashcards in neuro 460 - 464 Deck (42):
1

based on below symptoms, what is the location of stroke?

dysphagia, hoarseness, dec gag reflex

PICA

2

stroke in PICA is also called

lateral medullary (Wallenberg) syndrome

3

what effects (other than dysphagia and hoarseness) are specific to PICA?

nucleus ambiguus effects (motor innervation CN9, 10)

4

what are the unique clinical symptoms of AICA lesion?

paralysis of face, facial droop (due to facial nucleus)

5

AICA lesion is also called?

Lateral pontine syndrome

6

what are other symptoms of AICA lesion (other than facial droop)?

dec lacrimation, dec salivation, dec taste from ant 2/3 of tongue

7

what stroke lesion will result in ipsilateral hypoglossal dysfunction such as tongue deviating ipsilaterly?

ASA

8

ASA stroke is also known as

Medial medullary syndrome

9

what are the other ASA stroke symptoms (other than ipsilateral hypoglossal dysfunction)?

1. dec contralateral proprioception (due to medial lemniscus)
2. contralateral hemiparesis of the upper/lower limbs (due to lateral corticospinal tract)

10

pt with contralateral hemianopia with macular sparing, where is the stoke lesion?

PCA

11

what artery is the common location of lacunar infarct 2' to HTN?

lenticulostriate artery

12

clinical symptoms of lenticulostriate artery stroke?

contralateral hemiparesis/hemiplegia

13

contralateral paralysis of the lower limb & contralateral loss of sensation of lower limb is due to what stroke?

ACA (ant. cerebral)

14

name 4 unique clinical symptoms of MCA stroke

1. contralateral paralysis (upper limb/face)
2. contralateral loss of sensation (upper limb/face)
3. aphasia if in dominant (usually Lt) hemisphere
4. hemineglect if lesion affects nondominant (usually Rt. side)

15

clinical symptom of lesions in frontal eye fields?

eyes look toward lesion

16

location of the primary motor is precentral or postcentral?

precentral

17

what is post central?

primary somato sensory

18

in what situations do you see therapeutic hyperventilation (dec pCO2) helps dec intracranial pressure?

acute cerebral edema (stroke, trauma) via vasoconstriction

19

cerebral perfusion is primarily driven by

pCO2

20

what area is associated with extraocular movement during REM sleep?

paramedian pontine reticular formation

21

what infection is associated with Kluver Bucy syndrome (disinhibited behavior: hyperphagia, hypersexuality, hyperorality)?

HSV-1

22

what area of the brain is responsible for disinhibition and deficit in concentration, orientation, judgement and may have reemergence of primitive reflex?

frontal lobe

23

gerstmann syndrome is associated with what part of the brain lesion?

dominant parietal temporal cortex (usually Lt. hemisphere)

24

what are the symptoms of Gerstmann syndrome

agraphia, acalculia, finger agnosia, Lt to Rt. disorientation

25

what is the consequence of damaging reticular activating system (midbrain)?

1. reduced levels of arousal and wakefulness (coma)
2. loss of consciousness
3. stupor

26

what lesion will result in limb ataxia and falling toward the side of the lesion?

cerebellar hemisphere

27

what lesion will result in truncal ataxia and dysarthria?

cerebellar vermis

28

what is the diff btw aphasia and dysarthria?

aphasia is language deficit and dysarthria is movement deficit

29

where is Broca area?

inf. frontal gyrus of frontal lobe

30

where is wernicke area?

sup. temporal gyrus of termporal lobe

31

what type of aphasia leads to poor repetition, but fluent speech and intact comprehension?

conduction

32

what type of aphasia is associated with prosody?

broca (prosody: breif phase w/o intonation)

33

describe the broca aphasia

nonfluent with intact comprehension

34

describe the Wernicke aphasia

fluent with imparied comprehension

35

infarct of what blood vessel can lead to broca aphasia?

infarct of the superior division in MCA

36

infarct of what blood vessel can lead to Wernicke aphasia?

infarct of the inf. division of MCA

37

what type of aphasia leads to poor comprehension with fluent speech and intact repetition?

transcortical sensory (similar to Wernicke except for the poor repetition in Wernicke)

38

what type of aphasia is associated with nonfluent aphasia (halting speech), good comprehension with intact repetition?

transcrotical motor

39

what is the equation for CPP?

MAP - ICP

40

If CPP is zero, what does that mean?

no cerebral perfusion --> brain death

41

so in response to inc ICP, what does the body do?

inc MAP to maintain CPP

42

in what response/reflex do you see acute inc in ICP?

Cushing (hypertension, bradycardia, irregular breathing)