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Flashcards in vocabulary p-s Deck (500):
1

pacific

calm, peaceful

2

pacifist

one opposed to war

3

pacify

to restore calm, bring peace

4

palatial

like a palace, magnificent

5

palaver

idle talk

6

paleontology

study of past geological eras through fossil remains

7

palette

board for mixing paints; range of colors

8

palisade

fence made up of stakes

9

pall (n)

covering that darkens or obscures; coffin

10

pall (v)

to lose strength or interest

11

palliate

to make less serious, ease

12

pallid

lacking color or liveliness

13

palpable

obvious, real, tangible

14

palpitation

trembling, shaking, irregular beating

15

paltry

pitifully small or worthless

16

panacea

flamboyance, verve

17

pandemic

spread over a whole area or country

18

panegyric

elaborate praise; formal hymn of praise

19

panoply

impressive array

20

panorama

broad view; comprehensive picture

21

paradigm

ideal example, model

22

paradox

contradiction, incongruity; dilemma, puzzle

23

paradoxical

self-contradictory but true

24

paragon

model of excellence or perfection

25

paramount

supreme, dominant, primary

26

paraphrase

to reword, usually in simpler terms

27

parasite

person or animal that lives at another's expense

28

parch

to dry or shrivel

29

pare

to trim

30

pariah

outcast

31

parity

equality

32

parley

discussion, usually between enemies

33

parochial

of limited scope or outlook, provincial

34

parody

humorous imitation

35

parole

conditional release of a prisoner

36

parry

to ward off or deflect

37

parsimony

stinginess

38

partisan (n)

stronger supporter

39

partisan (adj)

biased in favor of

40

pastiche

piece of literature or music imitating other works

41

patent (adj)

obvious, unconcealed

42

patent (n)

official document giving exclusive right to sell an invention

43

paternity

fatherhood; descent from father's ancestors

44

pathogenic

causing disease

45

pathos

pity, compassion

46

patrician

aristocrat

47

patricide

murder of one's father

48

patrimony

inheritance or heritage derived from one's father

49

patronize

to condescend to, disparage; to buy from

50

paucity

scarcity, lack

51

pauper

very poor person

52

pavilion

tent or light building used for shelter or exhibitions

53

peccadillo

minor sin or offense

54

peculation

theft of money or goods

55

pedagogue

teacher

56

pedant

uninspiring, boring academic

57

pedestrian (adj)

commonplace

58

pediatrician

doctor specializing in children and their ailments

59

pediment

triangular gable on a roof or facade

60

peer (n)

contemporary, equal, match

61

peerless

unequaled

62

pejorative

having bad connotations; disparaging

63

pellucid

transparent; translucent; easily understood

64

penance

voluntary suffering to repent for a wrong

65

penchant

inclination

66

pending (prep)

during, while awaiting

67

penitent

expressing sorrow for sins or offenses, repentant

68

pensive

thoughtful

69

penultimate

next to last

70

penumbra

partial shadow

71

penury

extreme poverty

72

perambulator

baby carriage

73

percipient

discerning, able to perceive

74

perdition

complete and utter loss; damnation

75

peregrinate

to wander from place to place

76

perennial

present throughout the years; persistent

77

perfidious

faithless, disloyal, untrustworthy

78

perfunctory

done in a routine way; indifferent

79

perihelion

point in orbit nearest to the sun

80

peripatetic

moving from place to place

81

perjure

to tell a lie under oath

82

permeable

penetrable

83

pernicious

very harmful

84

perpetual

endless, lasting

85

personification

act of attributing human qualities to objects or abstract qualities

86

perspicacious

shrewd, astute, keen-witted

87

pert

lively and bold

88

pertinacious

persistent, stubborn

89

pertinent

applicable, appropriate

90

perturbation

disturbance

91

perusal

close examination

92

pervert (v)

to cause to change in immoral way; to misuse

93

pestilence

epidemic, plague

94

petulance

rudeness, peevishness

95

phalanx

massed group of soldiers, people, or things

96

philanderer

persuer of casual love affairs

97

philanthropy

love of humanity; generosity to worthy causes

98

philistine

narrow-minded person, someone lacking appreciation for art or culture

99

philology

study of words

100

phlegmatic

calm in temperament; sluggish

101

phobia

anxiety, horror

102

phoenix

mythical, immortal bird which lives for 500 years, burns itself to death, and rises from its ashes

103

phonetics

study of speech sounds

104

phonic

relating to sound

105

piety

devoutness

106

pilfer

to steal

107

pillage

to loot, especially during a war

108

pinnacle

peak, highest point of development

109

pious

dedicated, devout, extremely religious

110

pique

fleeting feeling of hurt pride

111

pithy

profound substantial; concise, succinct, to the point

112

pittance

meager amount or wage

113

placate

to soothe or pacify

114

placid

calm

115

plagiarist

one who steals words or ideas

116

plaintiff

injured person in a lawsuit

117

plait

to braid

118

platitude

stale, overused expression

119

plebeian

crude, vulgar, low-class

120

plenitude

abundance, plenty

121

plethora

excess, overabundance

122

pliant

pliable, yielding

123

pluck

to pull strings on musical instrument

124

plucky

courageous, spunky

125

plummet

to fall, plunge

126

pluralistic

including a variety of groups

127

ply (v)

to use diligently; to engage; to join together

128

pneumatic

relating to air; worked by compressed air

129

poach

to steal game or fish; cook in boiling liquid

130

podium

platform or lectern for orchestra conductors or speakers

131

poignant

emotionally moving

132

polar

relating to a geographic pole; exhibiting contrast

133

polarize

to tend towards opposite extremes

134

polemic

controversy, argument; verbal attack

135

politic

shrewd and practical, diplomatic

136

polyglot

speaker of many languages

137

ponderous

weighty, heavy, large

138

pontificate

to speak in a pretentious manner

139

pore (v)

to study closely or meditatively

140

porous

full of holes, permeable to liquids

141

portent

omen

142

portly

stout, dignified

143

posit

to put in position; to suggest an idea

144

posterior

bottom, rear

145

posterity

future generations; all of a person's descendants

146

potable

drinkable

147

potentate

monarch or ruler with great power

148

pragmatic

practical; moved by facts rather than abstract ideals

149

prattle

meaningless, foolish talk

150

precarious

uncertain

151

precept

principle; law

152

precipice

edge, steep overhang

153

precipitate (adj)

sudden and unexpected

154

precipitate (v)

to throw down from a height; to cause to happen

155

precipitous

hasty, quickly, with too little caution

156

precis

short summary of facts

157

precision

state of being precise

158

preclude

to rule out

159

precocious

unusually advanced at an early age

160

precursor

forerunner, predecessor

161

predator

one that preys on others, destroyer, plunderer

162

predicament

difficult situation

163

predicate (v)

to found or base on

164

predictive

relating to prediction, indicative of the future

165

predilection

preference, liking

166

predisposition

tendency, inclination

167

preeminent

celebrated, distinguished

168

preface

introduction to a book; introductory remarks to a speech

169

premeditate

to consider, plan beforehand

170

premonition

forewarning; presentiment

171

preponderance

majority in number; dominance

172

prepossessing

attractive, engaging, appealing

173

preposterous

absurd, illogical

174

presage

to foretell, indicate in advance

175

prescient

having foresight

176

prescribe

to set down a rule; to recommend a treatment

177

presentiment

premonition, sense of foreboding

178

prestidigitation

sleight of hand

179

presumptuous

rude, improperly bold

180

pretext

excuse, pretended reason

181

prevalent

widespread

182

prevaricate

to lie, evade the truth

183

primeval

ancient, primitive

184

primordial

original, existing from the beginning

185

pristine

untouched, uncorrupted

186

privation

lack of usual necessities or comforts

187

probity

honesty, high-mindedness

188

proclivity

tendency, inclination

189

procrastinator

one who continually and unjustifiably postpones

190

procure

to obtain

191

prodigal

wasteful, extravagant, lavish

192

prodigious

vast, enormous, extraordinary

193

profane

impure; contrary to religion; sacrilegious

194

proficient

expert, skilled in a certain subject

195

profligate

corrupt, degenerate

196

profuse

lavish, extravagent

197

progenitor

originator, forefather, ancestor in a direct line

198

progeny

offspring, children

199

prognosis

prediction of disease outcome; any prediction

200

progressive

favoring progress or change; moving forward, going step-by-step

201

proliferation

propagation, reproduction; enlargement, expansion

202

prolific

productive, fertile

203

prologue

introductory section of a literary work or play

204

promontory

piece of land or rock higher than its surroundings

205

promulgate

to make known publicly

206

propensity

inclination, tendency

207

propinquity

nearness

208

propitiate

to win over, appease

209

propitious

favorable, advantageous

210

proponent

advocate, defender, supporter

211

prosaic

relating to prose; dull, commonplace

212

proscribe

to condemn; to forbid, outlaw

213

prose

ordinary language used in everyday speech

214

prosecutor

person who initiates a legal action or suit

215

proselytize

to convert to a particular belief or religion

216

prostrate

lying face downward, lying flat on ground

217

protagonist

main character in a play or story, hero

218

protean

readily assuming different forms or characters

219

protestation

declaration

220

protocol

ceremony and manners observed by diplomats

221

protract

to prolong, draw out, extend

222

protrusion

something that sticks out

223

provincial

rustic, unsophisticated, limited in scope

224

provocation

cause, incitement to act or respond

225

prowess

bravery, skill

226

proximity

nearness

227

proxy

power to act as substitute for another

228

prude

one who is excessively proper or modest

229

prudent

careful, cautious

230

prurient

lustful, exhibiting lewd desires

231

pry

to intrude into; force open

232

pseudonym

pen name; fictitious or borrowed name

233

psychic (adj)

perceptive of non-material, spiritual forces

234

puerile

childish, immature, silly

235

pudgy

chubby, overweight

236

pugilism

boxing

237

pugnacious

quarrelsome, eager and ready to fight

238

pulchritude

beauty

239

pulverize

to pound, crush, or grind into powder; destroy

240

pummel

to pound, beat

241

punctilious

careful in observing rules of behavior or ceremony

242

pungent

strong or sharp in smell or taste

243

punitive

having to do with punishment

244

purgation

process of cleansing, purification

245

purge (v)

to cleanse or free from impurities

246

puritanical

adhering to a rigid moral code

247

purport

to profess, suppose, claim

248

quack (n)

faker; one who falsely claims to have medical skill

249

quadrilateral

four-sided polygon

250

quadruped

animal having four feet

251

quagmire

marsh; difficult situation

252

qualify

to provide with needed skills; modify, limit

253

quandary

dilemma, difficulty

254

quarantine

isolation period, originally 40 days, to prevent spread of disease

255

quaternary

consisting of or relating to four units or members

256

quell

to crush or subdue

257

querulous

inclined to complain, irritable

258

query (n)

question

259

quibble

to argue about insignificant and irrelevant details

260

quicken

to hasten, arouse, excite

261

quiescence

inactivity, stillness

262

quintessence

most typical example; concentrated essence

263

quiver (v)

to shake slightly, tremble, vibrate

264

quixotic

overly idealistic, impractical

265

quotidian

occuring daily; commonplace

266

raconteur

witty, skillful storyteller

267

radical (adj)

fundamental; drastic

268

rail (v)

to scold with bitter or abusive language

269

rally (v)

to assemble; recover, recuperate

270

ramble (v)

to roam, wander; to babble, digress

271

ramification

implication, outgrowth, or consequence

272

ramshackle

likely to collapse

273

rancid

spoiled, rotten

274

rancor

bitter hatred

275

rant

to harangue, rave, forcefully scold

276

rapport

relationship of trust and respect

277

rapt

deeply absorbed

278

rarefy

to make thinner, purer, or more refined

279

rash (adj)

careless, hasty, reckless

280

ratify

to approve formally, confirm

281

ratiocination

methodial, logical reasoning

282

ration (n)

portion, share

283

ration (v)

to supply; to restrict consumption of

284

rational

logical, reasonable

285

raucous

harsh-sounding; boisterous

286

ravage

to destroy, devastate

287

ravenous

extremely hungry

288

ravine

deep, narrow gorge

289

raze

to tear down, demolish

290

reactionary (adj)

marked by extreme conservatism, esp. in politics

291

rebuff (n)

blunt rejection

292

rebuke (v)

to reprimand, scold

293

rebut

to refute by evidence or argument

294

recalcitrant

resisting authority or control

295

recant

to retract a statement, opinion, etc

296

recapitulate

to review with a brief summary

297

receptive

open to others' ideas; congenial

298

reclusive

shut off from the world

299

recondite

relating to obscure learning; known to only a few

300

recount (v)

to describe facts or events

301

recruit (v)

to draft, enlist; to seek to enroll

302

rectify

to correct

303

rectitude

moral uprightness

304

recurrence

repetition

305

redress (n)

relief from wrong or injury

306

redundancy

unnecessary repetition

307

refectory

room where meals are served

308

reflection

image, likeness; opinion, thought, impression

309

reform (v)

to change, correct

310

refract

to deflect sound or light

311

refuge

escape, shelter

312

refurbish

to renovate

313

refute

to contradict, discredit

314

regimen

government rule; systematic plan

315

regress

to move backward; revert to an earlier form or state

316

rehabilitate

to restore to good health or condition; reestablish a person's good reputation

317

reiterate

to say again, repeat

318

rejoinder

response

319

rejuvenate

to make young again; renew

320

relegate

to assign to a class, especially an inferior one

321

relinquish

to renounce or surrender something

322

relish (v)

to enjoy greatly

323

remediable

capable of being corrected

324

remedy (v)

to cure, corect

325

reminiscence

remembrance of past events

326

remission

lessening, relaxation

327

remit

to send (usually money) as payment

328

remote

distant, isolated

329

remuneration

pay or reward for work, trouble, etc

330

renascent

reborn, coming into being again

331

renegade

traitor, person abandoning a cause

332

renege

to go back on one's word

333

renounce

to give up or reject a right, title, person, etc

334

renown

fame, widespread acclaim

335

repast

meal or mealtime

336

repeal

to revoke or formally withdraw (often a law)

337

repel

to rebuff, repulse; disgust, offend

338

repent

to regret a past action

339

repentant

apologetic, guilty, remorseful

340

replete

abundantly supplied

341

replicate

to duplicate, repeat

342

repose

relaxation, leisure

343

repress

to restrain or hold in

344

repression

act of restraining or holding in

345

reprehensible

blameworthy, disreputable

346

reprise

repetition, esp of a piece of music

347

reproach (v)

to find fault with; blame

348

reprobate

morally unprincipled person

349

reprove

to criticize or correct

350

repudiate

to reject as having no authority

351

repulse

repel, fend off; sicken, disgust

352

requiem

hymns or religious service for the dead

353

requite

to return or repay

354

rescind

to repeal, cancel

355

residue

remainder, leftover, remnant

356

resilient

able to recover quickly after illness or bad luck; able to bounce back to shape

357

resolute

determined; with a clear purpose

358

resolve (n)

determination, firmness of purpose

359

resolve (v)

to conclude, determine

360

resonate

to echo

361

respire

to breathe

362

respite

interval of relief

363

resplendent

splendid, brilliant

364

restitution

act of compensating for loss or damage

365

restive

impatient, uneasy, restless

366

restorative

having the power to renew or revitalize

367

restrained

controlled, repressed, restricted

368

resuscitate

to revive, bring back to life

369

retain

to hold, keep possession of

370

retard (v)

to slow, hold back

371

reticent

not speaking freely; reserved

372

retinue

group of attendants with an important person

373

retiring

shy, modest, reserved

374

retort

cutting response

375

retract

to draw in or take back

376

retrench

to regroup, reorganize

377

retrieve

to bring, fetch; reclaim

378

retroactive

applying to an earlier time

379

retrograde

having a backward motion or direction

380

retrospective

looking back to the past

381

revelry

boisterous festivity

382

revere

to worship, regard with awe

383

revert

to backslide, regress

384

revile

to criticize with harsh language, verbally abuse

385

revitalize

to renew; give new energy to

386

revoke

to annul, cancel, call back

387

revulsion

strong feeling of repugnance or dislike

388

rhapsody

emotional literary or musical work

389

rhetoric

persuasive use of language

390

rhythm

regular pattern or variation of sounds and stresses

391

ribald

humorous in a vulgar way

392

riddle (v)

to make many holes in; permeate

393

rife

widespread, prevalent; abundant

394

risque

bordering on being inappropriate or indecent

395

robust

strong and healthy; hardy

396

rococo

very highly ornamented

397

root (v)

to dig with a snout (like a pig)

398

rostrum

stage for public speaking

399

rotund

round in shape; fat

400

rue

to regret

401

ruminate

to contemplate, reflect upon

402

rustic

rural

403

saccharine

excessively sweet or sentimental

404

sacrosanct

extremely sacred; beyond criticism

405

sagacious

shrewd, wise

406

salient

prominent or conspicuous

407

sallow

sickly yellow in color

408

salubrious

healthful

409

salutation

greeting

410

sanction

permission, suport; law; penalty

411

sanctuary

haven, retreat

412

sanguine

ruddy; cheerfully optimistic

413

sardonic

cynical, scornfully mocking

414

satiate

to satisfy

415

saunter

to amble; walk in a leisurely manner

416

savant

learned person

417

savory

agreeable in taste or smell

418

scabbard

sheath for sword or dagger

419

scale (v)

to climb to the top of

420

scathing

harshly critical; painfully hot

421

scenario

plot outline; possible situation

422

scintilla

very small amount

423

scintillate

to sparkle, flash

424

scoff

to deride, ridicule

425

score (n)

notation for a musical composition

426

score (v)

to make a notch or scratch

427

scrivener

professional copyist

428

scrupulous

restrained; careful and precise

429

scrutiny

careful observation

430

scurrilous

vulgar, low, indecent

431

secant

straight line intersecting a curve at two points

432

secede

to withdraw formally from an organization

433

secluded

isolated and remote

434

sectarian

narrow minded; relating to a group or sect

435

secular

not specifically pertaining to religion

436

sedentary

inactive, stationary; sluggish

437

sedition

behavior promoting rebellion

438

seismology

science of earthquakes

439

seminal

relating to the beginning or seeds of something

440

senescent

aging, growing old

441

sensual

satisfying or gratifying the senses; suggesting sexuality

442

sententious

having a moralizing tone

443

sentient

aware, conscious, able to perceive

444

sequel

anything that follows

445

sequester

to remove or set apart; put into seclusion

446

seraphic

angelic, pure, sublime

447

serendipity

habit of making fortunate discoveries by chance

448

serenity

calm, peacefulness

449

serpentine

serpent-like; twisting, winding

450

serrated

saw-toothed, notched

451

servile

submissive, obedient

452

shard

piece of broken glass or pottery

453

sheepish

timid, meek or bashful

454

shirk

to avoid a task due to laziness or fear

455

signify

denote, indicate; symbolize

456

simian

ape-like; relating to apes

457

simper

to smirk, smile foolishly

458

sinecure

well-paying job or office that requires little or no work

459

singe

to burn slightly, scorch

460

sinuous

winding; intricate, complex

461

skeptical

doubtful, questioning

462

skulk

to move in a stealthy or cautious manner; sneak

463

slight

to treat as unimportant; insult

464

slipshod

careless, hasty

465

sloth

sluggishness, laziness

466

slough

to discard or shed

467

slovenly

untidy, messy

468

sluggard

lazy, inactive person

469

smelt (v)

to melt metal in order to refine it

470

snippet

tiny part, tidbit

471

sobriety

seriousness

472

sobriquet

nickname

473

sodden

thoroughly soaked; saturated

474

sojourn

visit, stay

475

solace

comfort in distress; consolation

476

solarium

room or glassed in area exposed to the sun

477

solecism

grammatical mistake

478

solicitous

concerned, attentive; eager

479

solidarity

unity based on common aims or interests

480

soliloquy

literary or dramatic speech by one character, not addressed to others

481

solipsism

belief that the self is the only reality

482

solstice

shortest and longest day of the year

483

soluble

capable of being solved or dissolved

484

somber

dark and gloomy; melancholy, dismal

485

somnambulist

sleepwalker

486

somnolent

drowsy, sleepy; inducing sleep

487

sonic

relating to sound

488

sonorous

producing a full, rich sound

489

sophist

person good at arguing deviously

490

sophistry

deceptive reasoning or argumentation

491

sophomoric

immature and overconfident

492

soporific

sleepy or tending to cause sleep

493

sordid

filthy; contemptible and corrupt

494

sovereign

having supreme power

495

spartan

austere, severe, grave; simple, bare

496

spawn

to generate, produce

497

speculation

contemplation; act of taking business risks for financial gain

498

speculative

involving assumption; uncertain; theoretical

499

spontaneous

on the spur of the moment, impulsive

500

sporadic

infrequent, irregular