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Flashcards in 644 Deck (46):
1

demagogue

\ˈd(e)-mə-ˌgäg\

D. one who stirs people up by emotional appeal in order to gain power

E. that politician is just a demagogue who preys upon people's fears and prejudices

2

demarcate

\di-ˈm(ä)r-ˌkāt\

D. to mark the limits of

E. The bounardy between the countries must be clearly demarcated.

3

demean

D. to degrade

E. He demeaned himself by accepting the bribe.

4

demeanor

D. bearing or behavior

E. the director of the opera company has a haughty demeanor that can be irritating

5

demise

\di-ˈm(ī)z\

D. death

E. our much beloved, recently demised leader

6

demolition

\ˌde-mə-ˈl(i)-shən\

D. destruction

E. The old factory is scheduled for demolition next week.

7

demonic

\di-ˈm(ä)-nik\

D. pertaining to demon

E. the villain in the movie cackled with demonic laughter

8

demur

\di-ˈm(ə)r\

D. to delay; to object

E. She suggested that he would win easily, but he demurred, saying he expected the election to be close.

9

demure

D. serious; reserved

E. She was wearing a demure gray suit.

10

denizen

D. an inhabitant

11

denouement

\ˌdā-ˌnü-ˈm(ä)\

D. the outcome or solution of a plot

E. In the play's denouement, the two lovers kill themselves.

12

depict

D. to protray

13

depilate

\ˈd(e)-pə-ˌlāt\

D. to rid of hair

E. depilatory creams (a substance used for removing body hair)

14

deplete

\di-ˈplēt\

D. to reduce or exhaust

E. Activities such as logging and mining deplete our natural resources.

15

deplore

D. to lament or feel sorry about

E. We deplore the development of nuclear weapons.

16

deploy

D. to station forces or troops in a planned way

E. He deploys several arguments to prove his point. / The troops were deployed for battle. / The parachute failed to deploy properly.

17

depravity

D. corruption

E. He was sinking into a life of utter depravity. / People were shocked by the depravity of her actions.

18

deprecate

D. to express disapproval of

E. movie critics tried to outdo one another in deprecating the comedy as the stupidest movie of the year

19

depredate

\ˈd(e)-prə-ˌdāt\

D. to plunder or despoil (to take the goods off by force, to use or use up wrongly)

20

depreciate

\di-ˈpr(ē)-shē-ˌāt\

D. to lessen in value

E. These changes have greatly depreciated the value of the house.

21

deranged

D. insane

E. being stranded at night on a lonely road would derange anyone / the storage room had all been deranged by the earthquake, and it took hours to sort out things

22

derelict

\ˈd(e)-rə-ˌlikt\

D. abandoned

E. the guards were judged derelict in their duty

23

deride

D. to mock

E. my brothers derided our efforts, but were forced to eat their words when we won first place

24

derogatory

\di-ˈr(ä)-gə-ˌtȯr-ē\

D. expressing a low opinion; disparaging

E. She indicated by her tone that this was only her private opinion and in no way derogatory of him.

25

descant

\ˈd(e)s-ˌkant\

D. to discuss at length

E. an English professor who loves to descant on his beloved Shakespeare

26

descry

\di-ˈskrī\

D. to detect, to catch sight of (sth distant or obscure)

E. we couldn't descry the reasons for his sudden departure / could just descry the ship coming over the horizon

27

desecrate

\ˈde-si-ˌkrāt\

D. to make profane

E. vandals desecrated the cemetery last night by covering the tombstones with graffiti

28

desiccate

\ˈd(e)-si-ˌkāt\

D. to dry up

E. add a cup of desiccated coconut to the mix

29

desist

\di-ˈs(i)st\

D. to stop

E. Despite orders from the police, the protesters would not desist.

30

despicable

D. contemptible

E. even within the prison population, pedophiles are regarded as particularly despicable

31

despoil

D. to stripe; to pillage

E. The landscape has been despoiled by industrial development. / the burglars despoiled the art museum in search of treasures they thought they could sell to a fence

32

despotism

\ˈd(e)s-pə-ˌti-zəm\

D. tyranny

E. by the end of the 20th century many countries around the world had rejected despotism in favor of democracy

33

destitute

\ˈd(e)s-tə-ˌtüt\

D. lacking; in extreme need of things

E. His business failures left him destitute.

34

desuetude

\d(e)-sūə-ˌtüd\

D. discontinuance from use or exercise

E. despite the long years of desuetude, the old manual typewriter seemed to work just fine

35

desultory

\ˈd(e)-sȯl-ˌtȯr-ē\

D. aimless; random

E. a desultory search for something of interest on TV / a desultory discussion about the news of the day

36

deterrent

\dē-t(ə)-rənt\

D. sth that discourages (sb) from an action

E. a deterrent view of punishment

37

detonate

\ˈdet-nāt\

D. to explode

E. The first atomic bomb was detonated in 1945.

38

detraction

D. belittling the worth of

E. her inevitable detraction of every new idea is annoying to the other club members

39

detriment

\ˈde-trə-mənt\

D. hurt; injury

E. opponents of casino gambling claim that it is a detriment to society at large / the requirement that runners wear shoes for the race worked to his detriment since he was used to running barefoot

40

deviate

D. to turn aside

E. sailors forced to deviate from their course in order to avoid the storm

41

devious

D. winding; going astray

E. a dishonest and devious politician / He took us by a devious route to the center of the city.

42

devoid

D. lacking

E. an argument devoid of sense / the so-called comedy is totally devoid of intelligence, originality, and even laughs

43

devolve

D. to cause power or responsibility to be given to other people

E. Community leaders hope that the new government will devolve more power to the community itself. / Somehow the debate devolved into a petty competition to see who could get more applause. / She cynically asserts that our species is devolving.

44

devout

D. pious

E. a devout baseball fan / born a devout coward

45

dexterous

D. skillful

46

diabolical

D. pertaining to the devil

E. he police quickly mobilized to track down the diabolical serial killer