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Gruber's 2300 > 874 > Flashcards

Flashcards in 874 Deck (46):
1

euphoria

D. a feeling of wellbeing

E. The initial euphoria following their victory in the election has now subsided.

2

euthanasia

D. painless death

3

evanescent

\e-və-'na-sənt\

D. fleeting

E. beauty that is as evanescent as a rainbow

4

evasive

D. not frank or straight forward

E. They took evasive action to avoid capture.

5

evince

\i-ˈvin(t)s\

D. to make evident; to display

E. the teenager caught shoplifting seemed to evince no remorse

6

eviscerate

D. to disembowel

E. the ancient Egyptians would eviscerate the bodies of the dead as part of the process of mummifying them

7

evoke

D. to call forth

8

evolve

D. to develop gradually; to unfold

9

exacerbate

D. to make more intense; to aggravate

E. The proposed factory shutdown would only exacerbate our unemployment problems.

10

exact

D. to call for; to require

E. They would not rest until they had exacted revenge. / He was able to exact a promise from them.

11

exasperate

D. to vex; to excite the anger of

E. The criticism of his latest movie is sure to exasperate his admirers.

12

excise

\ˈek-ˌsīz\

D. to cut away

E. an excise imposed on a number of goods

13

excoriate

\ek-ˈskȯr-ē-ˌāt\

D. to strip of skin; to denounce harshly

E. The candidates have publicly excoriated each other throughout the campaign.

14

exculpate

\ˈek-(ˌ)skəl-ˌpāt\

D. to free from blame

E. I will present evidence that will exculpate my client.

15

execrable

\ˈek-si-krə-bəl\

D. detestable

E. her execrable singing finally brought a complaint from the neighbors

16

exemplary

\ig-ˈzem-plə-rē\

D. serving as a good example

E. armies have traditionally used public execution as an exemplary punishment for the crime of desertion

17

exhort

\ig-ˈzȯrt\

D. to urge

E. She exhorted her listeners to support the proposition.

18

exigency

\ˈek-sə-jən(t)-sē

D. an emergency

E. the exigencies requiring snap decisions that traders on the stock exchange face every day

19

exiguous

\ig-ˈzi-gyə-wəs\

D. meager

E. computer equipment that would be prohibitively expensive, given the rural school's exiguous resources

20

exonerate

D. to acquit

E. the results of the DNA fingerprinting finally exonerated the man, but only after he had wasted 10 years of his life in prison

21

exorbitant

D. excessive; extravagant

E. the cost of our stay was so exorbitant you would have thought that we had bought the hotel and not just spent a few nights there

22

exorcise

D. to drive out (an evil spirit)

E. The movie is about a priest who tries to exorcise demons from a young girl. / please exorcise that offensive word from your vocabulary

23

expatiate

\ek-ˈspā-shē-ˌāt\

D. to talk freely and at length

E. the naturalist is known for her willingness to expatiate on any number of issues relating to wildlife and the environment

24

expedient

\ik-ˈspē-dē-ənt\

D. advantageous (ex-out+ped-foot)

E. Do the right thing, not the expedient thing.

25

expedite

\ˈek-spə-ˌdīt\

D. to speed up or made easy (ex-out+ped-foot)

E. They've asked the judge to expedite the lawsuits.

26

expeditious

\ˌek-spə-ˈdi-shəs\

D. efficient and quick (ex-out+ped-foot)

E. a company that is well-regarded for its expeditious handling of any request or complaint

27

expiate

\ˈek-spē-ˌāt\

D. to atone for; to put an end to

E. Yom Kippur is the holy day on which Jews are expected to expiate sins committed during the past year.

28

expound

D. to set forth

E. The article expounds the virtues of a healthy diet.

29

expunge

\ik-ˈspənj\

D. to blot out; to erase

E. time and the weather have expunged any evidence that a thriving community once existed here

30

expurgate

\ˈek-spər-ˌgāt\

D. to rid (a book) of offensive

E. They felt it was necessary to expurgate his letters before publishing them.

31

extant

\ˈek-stənt\

D. in existence

E. one of the oldest buildings still extant

32

extemporaneous

\(ˌ)ek-ˌstem-pə-ˈrā-nē-əs\

D. not planned

E. caught by surprise, I had to make an extemporaneous speech at the awards banquet

33

extenuate

\ik-ˈsten-yə-ˌwāt\

D. to make thin; to diminish

E. don't even try to extenuate their vandalism of the cemetery with the old refrain of “Boys will be boys”

34

extirpate

\ˈek-stər-ˌpāt\

D. to pluck out

E. the triumph of modern medicine in extirpating certain diseases

35

extol

D. to praise

36

extort

D. to take from a person by force

E. a school bully who was used to extorting lunch money from weaker kids

37

extradition

\ek-strə-'di-shən\

D. the officially send back somebody who has been accused or found guilty of a crime to the country where the crime was committed

E. the extradition of terrorist suspects

38

extraneous

\ek-'strā-\

D. not essential

E. the professor would have covered all of the course material if she had refrained from her extraneous remarks on just about everything

39

extricate

\ˈek-strə-ˌkāt\

D. to free

E. Several survivors were extricated from the wreckage.

40

extrinsic

\ek-ˈstrin-zik\

D. not essential; extraneous

E. the fact that the ring belonged to your grandmother is extrinsic to its value to a jeweler

41

extrovert

D. one whose interest is directed outside himself

42

extrude

D. to force or push out

E. The machine extrudes enough molten glass to fill the mold. / a toy made from extruded plastic

43

exuberant

D. profuse; effusive

E. His exuberant personality makes him fun to be around.

44

exude

\ig-ˈzüd\

D. to ooze; to diffuse; to radiate

E. The flowers exuded a sweet fragrance. / exudes charm

45

fabricate

D. to build; to lie

46

façade

\fə-ˈsäd\

D. the front of the building

E. I could sense the hostility lurking behind her polite facade. / They were trying to preserve the facade of a happy marriage.