1702 Flashcards Preview

Gruber's 2300 > 1702 > Flashcards

Flashcards in 1702 Deck (46):
1

philander

\fə-ˈlan-dər\

D. to have casual or illicit sex with a woman or with many women; especially : to be sexually unfaithful to one's wife

E. he can't seem to stop philandering, even now that he's on his fifth marriage

2

philanthropist

D. one who gives money to help others

3

philistine

\ˈfi-lə-ˌstēn\

D. a person who is guided by materialism and is usually disdainful of intellectual or artistic values

E. She dismissed critics of her work as philistines.

4

phlegmatic

D. sluggish; calm

5

phobia

D. an irrational fear (of sth)

6

physiognomy

\ˌfi-zē-ˈä(g)-nə-mē\

D. one's facial expressions; the shape and features of a person's face

E. a fierce physiognomy. / the physiognomy of a nation.

7

pied

\ˈpīd\

D. spotted

E. a pied horse

8

piety

D. the state of having or showing a deep respect for somebody/something, especially for God and religion; the state of being pious; devotion to family

E. her piety is quiet but profound

9

pillage

\ˈpi-lij\

D. to loot or plunder (especially in war)

E. The town was pillaged and burned.

10

pinion

\ˈpin-yən\

D. to hold or tie somebody, especially by their arms, so that they cannot move

E. Joan of Arc was pinioned to a stake and burned as a heretic.

11

pious

D. devout

12

piquant

\ˈpē-kənt\

D. agreeably stimulating to the palate, especially : spicy; provocative

E. He served the fish with a piquant sauce. / a piquant bit of gossip

13

pique

\ˈpēk\

D. to offend or provoke

E. After a moment of pique, the senator responded calmly to his accusers. / He slammed the door in a fit of pique.

14

pithy

D. meaningful and concise

15

pittance

\ˈpi-tən(t)s\

D. a meager amount

E. the internship offers only a pittance for a salary, but it is a great opportunity to gain experience

16

placate

D. to pacify

17

placid

D. calm, quiet

18

plaintive

\ˈplān-tiv\

D. mournful

E. We could hear the plaintive cry of a wounded animal in the woods.

19

plait

\ˈplāt\

D. to pleat or braid

E. My mum taught me how to plait my own hair.

20

platitude

D. a dull and commonplace remark

E. His speech was filled with familiar platitudes about the value of hard work and dedication.

21

platonic

\plə-ˈtä-nik\

D. being a relationship marked by the absence of romance or sex

E. They had a platonic friendship, not a romantic one.

22

plaudit

\ˈplä-dət\

D. applause; enthusiastic approval

E. the proud parents bragged that their daughter had received many plaudits for her academic achievements

23

plausible

D. reasonable and likely to be true

24

plebeian

\pli-ˈbē-ən\

D. a common (or of the lower social classes) man

E. plebeian tastes

25

plebiscite

\ˈple-bə-ˌsīt\

D. vote by the people of a country or a region on an issue that is very important

E. to hold a plebiscite on the country's future system of government

26

plenary

\ˈplē-nə-rē\

D. full; complete (com"ple"te, "ple"nary)

E. A plenary meeting of the 500 members was held last summer.

27

plenipotentiary

\ˌple-nə-pə-ˈten(t)-sh(ə-)rē\

D. a person who has full powers to take action, make decisions, etc. on behalf of their government, especially in a foreign country (plenus-full, potent-power)

E. He was promoted from minister plenipotentiary to full ambassador.

28

plethora

\ˈplä-thə-rə\

D. excess

e. A plethora of books have been written on the subject. / a biology textbook that is helpfully illustrated with a plethora of excellent illustrations

29

plutocracy

\plü-ˈtä-krə-sē\

D. government by the wealthy (ploutos-wealth)

E. If only the wealthy can afford to run for public office, are we more a plutocracy than a democracy?

30

poach

D. to trespass; to steal

31

pogrom

\ˈpō-grəm\

D. an organized massacre of helpless people because of their race or religion (originally the killing of Jews in Russia)

32

poignant

\ˈpȯi-nyənt\

D. painfully affecting the feelings

E. The photograph was a poignant reminder of her childhood.

33

politic

\ˈpä-lə-ˌtik\

D. prudent; crafty

E. the actor is politic in discussing the aborted film project, being content to say that there were “creative differences”

34

poltroon

\päl-ˈtrün\

D. a spiritless coward

E. those poltroons in the state legislature who have caved in to bigotry on this important issue of basic civil rights

35

polygamy

\pə-'li-gə-mē\

D. having more than one husband or wife

E. a polygamous marriage/society

36

polyglot

\ˈpä-lē-ˌglät\

D. knowing, using or written in more than one language

E. a polyglot nation

37

pommel

\ˈpä-məl\

D. the knob on the hilt of a sword or saber

E. the elderly woman pommeled the would-be thief with her handbag until he begged for mercy

38

pompous

\ˈpäm-pəs\

D. excessively elevated or ornate; having or exhibiting self-importance

E. She found it difficult to talk about her achievements without sounding pompous.

39

ponder

D. to consider carefully

40

portend

\pȯr-ˈtend\

D. to foreshadow

E. The distant thunder portended a storm.

41

portent

D. an omen

42

portly

D. stout, rather fat

E. a portly gentleman who clearly didn't get enough exercise

43

posit

D. to place in position; to set forth as fact

E. Most religions posit the existence of life after death.

44

posterity

\pä-ˈster-ə-tē\

D. all future generation

E. Posterity will remember her as a woman of courage and integrity.

45

posthumous

\ˈpäs-chə-məs\

D. born after the death of the father; published after the death of the author; following or occurring after death

E. posthumous fame

46

postprandial

\pōs(t)-ˈpran-dē-əl\

D. after dinner; occurring after a meal

E. postprandial oratory / a postprandial brandy.