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Flashcards in extra Deck (71):
1

verbose

d. wordy

2

verdant

D. fresh and green

3

verily

\ˈver-ə-lē\

D. truly

E. I verily believe that these accusations are false. / verily, I don't remember a single thing about that course

4

verisimilar

\ˌver-ə-ˈsi-mə-lər\

D. having the appearance of truth

5

verity

D. truth, a belief or principle about life that is accepted as true

E. the eternal verities of life

6

vernacular

\və(r)-ˈna-kyə-lər\

D. the language spoken in a particular area or by a particular group, especially one that is not the official or written language

E. writes essays in a very easy-to-read, vernacular style / the vernacular architecture of the region

7

versatile

\ˈvər-sə-təl\

D. changeable; adaptable

E. He's a versatile actor who has played a wide variety of parts. / Eggs are easy to cook and are an extremely versatile food. /

8

vertigo

\ˈvər-ti-ˌgō\

D. the feeling of dizziness and fear, and of losing your balance, that is caused in some people when they look down from a very high place

9

vestige

D. a small part of something that still exists after the rest of it has stopped existing

E. the last vestiges of the old colonial regime

10

viable

\ˈvī-ə-bəl\

D. able or likely to live

E. If there was any delay then the rescue plan would cease to be viable.

11

viand

\ˈvī-ənd\

D. sth to eat

E. a shop selling caviar, foie gras, designer chocolates, and other pricey viands

12

vicarious

\vī-ˈker-ē-əs, və-\

D. felt or experienced by watching or reading about somebody else doing something, rather than by doing it yourself

E. He got a vicarious thrill out of watching his son score the winning goal.

13

vicissitudes

\vi-ˈsi-sə-ˌtüd\

D. one of the many changes and problems in a situation or in your life, that you have to deal with

E. the vicissitudes of family life

14

victuals

\ˈvi-təls\

D. food and drink

E. the navy was usually equipped, clothed and victualled by the Crown

15

vie

\vī\

D. to compete strongly with somebody in order to obtain or achieve something

E. a row of restaurants vying with each other for business

16

vigilant

\'vi-gi-le'nt\

D. very careful to notice any signs of danger or trouble

E. A pilot must remain vigilant at all times.

17

vilify

\'vi-le'-fī\

D. to say or write unpleasant things about somebody/something so that other people will have a low opinion of them; to slander

E. the vilification of single parents by right-wing politicians

18

vindicate

D. to free of blame

19

virile

\'vi-re'l\

D. having or showing the strength and energy that is considered typical of men

E. a virile performance / virile athleticism

20

vindictive

\vin-'dic-\

D. trying to harm or upset somebody, or showing that you want to, because you think that they have harmed you

E. ‘It serves them right,’ he thought vindictively.

21

virtuoso

D. a person who is extremely skilful at doing something, especially playing a musical instrument

E. a piano virtuoso

22

virulent

\'vi-rü-le'nt\

D. extremely dangerous or harmful and quick to have an effect; deadly

E. a virulent form of influenza / virulent criticism

23

visage

\'vi-sē-g\

D. a person's face

E. an old man with a noticeably happy visage / the grimy visage of a mining town

24

viscid

\vicid\

D. sticky, slimy and viscous

E. honey that turned even more viscid in the / coldthe viscid lining of the intestine

25

viscous

\'vis-ce's\

D. thick and sticky; not flowing freely

E. viscous syrup that takes forever to pour from a narrow-neck bottle

26

visionary

D. original and showing the ability to think about or plan the future with great imagination and intelligence; relating to dreams or strange experiences, especially of a religious kind

E. a visionary leader / visionary experiences

27

vitiate

D. to spoil or reduce the effect of something

E. The ‘yes’ vote was vitiated by the low turnout (the number of people who attend a particular event) in the election.

28

vitriolic

\vi-\

D. bitter

E. a film critic noted for the vitriol and sometimes outright cruelty of his pronouncements

29

vituperation

\vī-tü-pe'-'rā-\

D. cruel and angry criticism

E. She was unprepared for the flood of vituperation which descended on her from her critics.

30

vivacious

\vī-'vā-she's\

D. having a lively, attractive personality

E. He had three pretty, vivacious daughters. / He was charmed by her beauty and vivacity.

31

vivid

D. lively; intense

32

vociferous

\vo-'si-fe'-re's\

D. expressing your opinions or feelings in a loud and confident way

E. vociferous protests

33

volatile

\vä-le'-te'l\

D. changing easily from one mood to another

E. a highly volatile situation from which riots might develop

34

volition

\vo-'li-\

D. the power to choose something freely or to make your own decisions

E. They left entirely of their own volition(= because they wanted to).

35

voluble

\'vä-lyü-\

D. talking a lot, and with enthusiasm, about a subject; expressed in many words and spoken quickly

E. Evelyn was very voluble on the subject of women's rights. / voluble protests

36

voluptuous

\ve'-'lop-ch-\

D. attractive in a sexual way with large breasts and hips; giving you physical pleasure; inclined to luxury

E. a voluptuous woman / She yawned and stretched voluptuously. / a long and voluptuous holiday

37

voracious

\ve'-'rā-\

D. greedy

E. to have a voracious appetite / a voracious reader

38

votary

\'vo-te'-rē\

D. a person who worships or loves somebody or something

E. a votary of John Keats

39

vouchsafe

\vau̇ch-ˈsāf\

D. to give, offer or tell something to somebody, especially in order to give them a special advantage

E. He vouchsafed the secret to only a few chosen disciples.

40

vulnerable

D. weak and easily hurt physically or emotionally

41

waggish

D. playful: funny, clever and not serious

E. waggish remarks

42

waive

\wāv\

D. to choose not to demand something in a particular case, even though you have a legal or official right to do so

E. fee waiver / We have decided to waive the tuition fees in your case.We have decided to waive the tuition fees in your case.

43

wan

\wän\

D. looking pale and weak

E. She gave me a wan smile (= showing no energy or enthusiasm). / the wan sunlight of a winter's morning / He smiled wanly.

44

wane

\wān\

D. to become gradually weaker or less important

E. Her enthusiasm for the whole idea was waning rapidly.

45

wanton

\'wän-te'n\

D. Extreme and showing no care at all

E. a wanton disregard for human life / the wanton killing of innocent creatures

46

warranty

\'wo-re'n-tē\

D. a guarantee

E. The television comes with a full two-year warranty. / Is the car still under warranty?

47

wary

\'wā-rē\

D. cautious

E. The police will need to keep a wary eye on this area of town / She was wary of getting involved with him.

48

wastrel

\'wās-tre'l\

D. a lazy person who spends their time and/or money in a careless and stupid way

E. the black sheep of the family, he ended up being a wastrel and a drunkard

49

weal

\wēl\

D. a sound, healthy, or prosperous state; welfare

50

wheedle

D. to coax

51

whet

\wet\

D. to increase your desire for or interest in something; to sharpen

E. The book will whet your appetite for more of her work. / whet a knife

52

whimsical

D. fanciful

53

whit

\wit\

D. (the) least bit

E. I care not a whit about what other people think.

54

wily

\'wī-lē\

D. clever at getting what you want, and willing to trick people

E. The boss is a wily old fox. / He was outwitted by his wily opponent.

55

windfall

\ˈwin(d)-ˌfȯl\

D. something (as a tree or fruit) blown down by the wind; a surprising bit of good luck

E. hitting the lottery jackpot was an incredible windfall for the recently laid-off worker

56

winnow

\'wi-no\

D. to blow air through grain in order to remove its outer covering; to separate desirable and undesirable elements

E. The least qualified applicants were winnowed out of the initial pool.

57

winsome

\'win-som\

D. pleasant and attractive

E. a winsome smile

58

witless

D. foolish

E. a dog so witless that it is barely trainable / He committed a witless blunder.

59

witticism

D. a clever and amusing remark

E. a collection of famous witticisms

60

wizened

\'wi-ze'n-\

D. looking smaller and having many folds and lines in the skin, because of being old

E. wizened apples / her old wizened face

61

wont

\wont\

D. accustomed

E. He was wont to fall asleep after supper.

62

wraith

\rā-\

D. the ghost of a person that is seen a short time before or after that person dies

E. a wraith-like figure (= a very thin, pale person)

63

wreak

\rēk\

D. to do great damage or harm to somebody/something

E. heir policies would wreak havoc on the economy. / He swore to wreak vengeance on those who had betrayed him.

64

wrest

\rast\

D. to take something such as power or control from somebody/something with great effort

E. They attempted to wrest control of the town from government forces. / He wrested the gun from my grasp.

65

wry

\rī\

D. twisted; showing that you are both amused and disappointed or annoyed; amusing in a way that shows irony

E. ‘At least we got one vote,’ she said with a wry smile. / a wry comedy about family life

66

yeoman

\'yo-me'n\

D. a person who owns and cultivates a small farm; one that performs great and loyal service; a person attending or assisting another

E. did a yeoman's job in seeing the program through

67

zany

D. clownish; crazy

E. one of the challenges of hosting a radio call-in program is preventing the zanies from completely taking over the discussion / a zany plan to drive cross-country on a motorized scooter

68

zealot

D. a person who is extremely enthusiastic about something, especially religion or politics

69

zenith

\'ze-ni-\

D. the highest point

E. The sun rose towards its zenith. / The rock band was at the zenith of its creative powers.

70

zephyr

\'ze-fe'r\

D. a soft gentle wind

E. a summer zephyr gently stirred her hair

71

zest

\zest\

D. spirited enjoyment

E. He had a great zest for life. / The slight risk added zest to the experience.