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Flashcards in Chapter 14 Deck (61)
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1

What is NG Tube?

Nasogastric Tube
plastic or rubber tubes
Inserted through the nasopharynx into the stomach

2

NG Tube is used for

Administration of medications
Gastric decompression (most common)
Removal of gas (flatus) & fluids from stomach after intestinal obstruction or major trauma

3

5 types of NG tube are

Levin (common)
Sump (common)
Nutriflex
Moss
Sengstaken-Blackemore (S-B)

4

Levin tube

Most common
1 lumen
Plastic
Passed through nose into stmach

5

Levin tube used for

Gastric decompression

6

Sump tube also called

Salem-sump tube
Most common

7

Sump tube is

Double-lumen
Blue extension (* pig-tail) is the 2nd lumen
Lets air flow into stomach

8

Nutriflex tube

1 lumen
mercury-weight tip
feeding

9

Moss tube

3 lumen-complex
Balloon to anchor into stomach
2nd & 3rd lumen used for aspiration & feeding

10

Sengstaken-Blackemore tube
(S-B)

3 lumens
thick catheter
2 balloon
control bleeding from esophagus

11

Nasogastric Tube Equipment

NG tube
Water-soluble lubricant
20 to 50 ml syringe
Tetracaine
Contrast (under fluoro in correct place)
Tissue
Tape
Emesis basin
Gloves
Towels
Glass of water with straw
Saline (flush it)

12

Nasoenteric Tube (NE Tube)

Same material as NG tubes
Inserted same as an NG
Passes into duodenum & small intestines by peristalsis
Weighted metal tip (single)

13

NE Tube used for

Decompression
Diagnosis
Treatment

14

3 types of NE tube

Cantor
Harris
Miller-Abbott

15

Entriflex / Dobhoff tube

Single narrow lumen tube with removable wire stylet
Placed into duodenum or jejunum
Not used with suction
Thinner & more flexible than NG tubes
Leave in for long periods of time

16

Gastrostomy Tube

A surgical creation of an opening into the stomach from where a tube is placed from inside the stomach to the external abdominal wall

17

Gastrostomy Tube Used for

Feeds a patient who cannot tolerate the intake of oral food
Temporary or permanent

18

Most common type of Gastrostomy Tube is

PEG tube (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy)
Placed during endoscopy or surgery

19

Central Venous Lines also called

central venous catheters or venous access devices
Also named for developer – Hickman or Groshong

20

Central Venous Lines

Wide variety of clinical application
Administer a variety of drugs
Manage fluid volume
Serve as a conduit for blood analysis & transfusions
Monitor cardiac pressure

21

Central Venous Lines mainly used for

chemotheraphy & parenteral nutrition
May be single-, double-, or multi-lumen

22

Most common insertion site of Central Venous Lines is

Subclavian vein
Can also use internal jugular & femoral veins

23

Position of Central Venous Lines should be

Superior vena cava – approximately 2 to 3 cm above opening of right atrium

24

Pulmonary Arterial (PA) Catheter also called

Swan-Ganz catheters

25

Pulmonary Arterial (PA) Catheter

Single- or multi- lumen CV lines
Incorporates a small electrode @ distal end, used to monitor arterial pressure
Distal tip will be in one of the two pulmonary arteries
Enters through the right internal jugular & ends in right PA

26

Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)

Inserted by a nurse/radiologist/or specially trained radiographer
Inserted into the patient’s arm and advanced until its tip lies in a central vein (best side of pt)

27

Implanted Access Port

Port-A-Cath, Infusa Port, Mediport (lung)(pt w/port not have a good vein)

28

Implanted Access Port used for

Patients with long term illnesses requiring frequent IV medications or transfusions

29

Implanted Access Port made of

plastic, titanium or stainless steel

30

Implanted Access Port Implanted into

the subcutaneous tissue of the chest
Not visible but can be palpated
Catheter from the port is inserted into the subclavian or internal jugular vein
Utilizes a huber needle