Endothelium, Plaque Rupture and Vascular Injury Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Endothelium, Plaque Rupture and Vascular Injury Deck (44)
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1

What does PAD stand for?

peripheral artery disease

1

What are the characteristics of an arterial thrombus?

1. platelet rich 2. plaque rupture 3. areas of high flow 4. atherosclerosis, trauma, APLA 5. antiplatelet therapy

2

What do foam cells secrete and what is the relevance?

MMP- causes plaque to become unstable

3

A 70 year-old female with a history of hypercholesterolemia presents with intermittent substernal chest pain at rest and 2 mm of ST depression in the lateral leads of an ECG. The pain is improved with nitroglycerin, aspirin, an unfractionated heparin infusion, and a glycoprotein 2b/3a receptor inhibitor. Which of the following best describes the pathophysiology within the circumflex coronary artery?

The fibrous cap of a lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaque ruptured. The plaque was previously 50% obstructive but now a platelet-rich thrombus has formed on the exposed subendothelial components of the plaque such that the lesion is now 90% obstructive to blood (NSTEMI).

3

A 20 year-old female lives in Alaska and has no risk factors for atherosclerosis or thrombosis. In the winter, she develops ischemia of all fingers when exposed to cold. (This ischemia manifests as pain and symmetric color changes of her digits and is called Raynaud’s phenomenon.) What is the mechanism for this patient’s ischemia?

Vasospasm.

4

Nitric oxide synthase is expressed on the ____ side of the ____.

luminal; epi

4

What is a vulnerable plaque?

lipid rich with a thin cap and many inflammatory cells

4

What is the common mechanism for angina?

a stable, obstructive lesion

5

Unhealthy vascular beds are in a state of _____.

inflammation

5

Describe the characteristics of a venous thrombus.

1. fibrin rich 2. RBCs 3. areas of stasis 4. genetic predisposition 5. environmental predisposition 6. treated with anticoagulation

6

What does an athroembolism from the carotid bifurcation cause? Where?

a stroke; brain and ophthalmic artery occlusion (blindness)

7

What do foam cells do?

1. activate SM cells to induce their migration and proliferation 2. induce apoptosis of endothelial cells 3. cause fibrosis of the intima 4. perpetuate inflammation

7

Where do you listen for bruits?

at the carotid bifurcation (just below the jaw)

9

What best describes normal endothelial histology?

a monolayer of cells that comprises the intima, or innermost layer of a vessel wall, and is in direct contact with blood constituents within the vessel lumen

10

What can happen when a plaque ruptures?

either a thrombus is formed, causing an MI, or it heals but the lumen is narrowed b/c of a fibrous intima

11

A 76 year-old male with an abnormal exercise treadmill test (2 mm ST depression after walking for 5 minutes) experiences exertional chest discomfort every time he climbs 3 flights of stairs. The discomfort is relieved within 5 minutes of rest (typical angina). Which of the following best describes the pathophysiology within the culprit coronary artery?

There is an atherosclerotic plaque that is 70% obstructive. Coronary flow is limited with exercise but not at rest. Tx: nitrates, revasularization

11

NO causes vasodilation and also ______ when it diffuses into endothelial cells.

affects expression of inflammatory genes

12

How do stable plaques present?

angina or claudication upon exertion

13

How does a mac become a foam cell?

they ingest LDL

15

The same patient also experiences right calf discomfort when walking 3 blocks. The discomfort is relieved within 5 minutes of rest (typical claudication). Which of the following best describes the pathophysiology within the right superficial femoral artery?

There is an atherosclerotic plaque that is 70% obstructive. Blood flow is limited with exercise but not at rest.

16

NO causes _____-mediated vasodilation.

cGMP

18

Large arteries – more elastin Smaller arteries – ______ Arterioles – more smooth muscle

more collagen

19

If the MI is caused by a plaque rupture that results in a completely occlusive thrombus, it is called a _____ and is treated by _____.

STEMI; recanalization

20

How does leg claudication present?

pain or discomfort in the leg upon exertion; almost always in the calf

21

A 35 year-old female is taking oral contraceptives containing estrogen and has Factor V Leiden, a genetic predisposition to venous thrombosis. She develops an acutely edematous right leg. A duplex US shows a deep venous thrombosis of the right femoral vein. Before unfractionated heparin is started in the emergency department, she develops acute pleuritic chest pain and shortness of breath. A CT angiogram reveals an acute pulmonary embolism. What is the mechanism for the pulmonary embolism?

There has been thromboembolism. The deep venous thrombosis migrated to the pulmonary arteries.

22

What is the common mechanism for a stroke?

1. athroembolism of a carotid bifurcation lesion 2. thromboembolism from the L atrial appendage in A-fib

23

Large arteries – more elastin Smaller arteries – more collagen Arterioles – more _____

smooth muscle

24

What is venous thromboembolic disease?

blood clots in the veins--- DVTs and PEs

25

If the MI is caused by a plaque rupture that results in a non-occlusive thrombosis, it is called a _____ and is treated by ____.

NSTEMI; anticoagulation/vasodilators

27

What occurs in the abnormal endothelium?

a) Increased permeability to lipoprotein particles. b) Increased expression of cell adhesion molecules and increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, IL-1) resulting in increased leukocyte recruitment. c) Decreased release of nitric oxide and prostacyclin which predisposes to vasoconstriction, platelet activation, and thrombosis.