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Flashcards in Photographs Deck (18):
1

  • Are very important for success
  • Feature reconstruction is impractical without several photographs.

Major Restorations

2

It is good practice to request photographs on all cases even though major restorative work is not necessary.

  • A photograph can reveal
    • Hairstyle
    • Degree of fullness to the face
    • Expression

For a Normal Case

3

These are valueable because of their size.

  • Be aware of alterations
    • Despite these, this kind of photograph is helpful within its limitations.

Professional Portraits

4

  • Photographer may modify or erase imortant characteristics to flatter the subject.
  • Artistic lighting may be used for different effects.
    • Illusory
    • Dramatic
    • Corrective

Alterations of professional portraits to be aware of

5

Reveal details that will supplement information gained from the professional portrait.

Snapshots

6

Each picture may reveal a certain aspect more clearly than others, therefore, a choice of several pictures is made.

The Value of Several Snapshots

7

Will show the size, length, and width of features in relationship to the face.

Frontal View

8

This is of great value.

  • Reveals projections and recessions important to feature reconstruction.

The Profile View

9

This is a little less valueable than profile view.

  • Will suggest the form of the profile.
  • Reveals the degree of fullness of the cheeks.
  • Appearance of the lips 

The Three-Quarter View

10

  • Recent
  • Sharp but not flat-lighted
  • Include no more than one other photo
  • Subject is hatless
  • Subject is not laughing
  • Subject is not smoking
  • Snapshots of someone with their eyes closed will also be of value.

Pictures of the Greatest Value

11

Inspecting the face in this manner will reveal the most accurate information.

  • Being unfamiliar with this view allows concentration on a specific area.
    • You are less likely to be distracted by a smiling mouth or open eyes.
  • Asymmetrical forms are much more easily noted.
  • When modeling, the most convienent position will be above the head of the deceased.

Inversion of the photograph

12

By looking at a photograph in this position, you are observing the face in the same position many embalmers use for restorative art- standing above the head.

  • The unnaturalness of this position can make facial features more recognizable.

Upside Down

13

Surfaces laying at right angles to the source of lighting reflect the maximum amount of light.

Highlight

14

Surfaces which do not receive the full rays of light (or are obscured by other surfaces) reflect little or no light.

Shadow

15

Interpretaion of the highlights and shadows of the photograph in their proper relationship to natural prominences, cavities, and depressions of the face.

  • Under normal lighting
  • Under directional lighting
  • Under flat lighting

16

  • Prominences which have the greatest projection reflect the most light.
  • Deeper areas reflect little light and therefore appear darker.

Under Normal Lighting (From Above The Head)

17

  • May falsify the normal light and dark areas.
  • Require interpretation by means of a knowledge of normal relationships and intimate comparison to the balance of the two halves of the face.

Under Directional Lighting (For Special Effects)

18

Has the same effect as directional lighting:

  • May falsify the normal light and dark areas.
  • Require interpretation by means of a knowledge of normal relationships and intimate comparison to the balance of the two halves of the face.

Under Flat Lighting (Using a Flash)